• Carl D

    Carl D

    @carl-d

    Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 240 total)
    Author
    Replies
    • in reply to: Edgebashedon #2584909

      “Microsoft Edge is starting to annoy me big time”

      Actually, it’s been annoying me (and presumably many others) for quite some time now.

      What is it with these constant, almost daily browser updates? One only needs to look here to see how ridiculous browser “updates” for the 3 ‘main’ browsers have become these days.

      https://www.tenforums.com/browsers-email/

      I don’t use Google Chrome and never have but I can see from there that it’s just as annoying with it’s constant updates as Edge is with Firefox coming in third (but rapidly catching up on the other two).

      I understand that security updates are necessary but (in the case of Edge especially) the majority of “updates” seem to be just adding more useless bloat which most people will probably never use and is always turned on by default of course.

      As I said, I mainly use Firefox but I do keep Edge updated but it is starting to get very time consuming to go through all of Edge’s settings after an update to see what extra bloat has been added and turn it off.

      It really seems to be a competition to see which browser can add the most (mostly useless) bloat and then claim that “our browser is better than the others”, isn’t it? I wouldn’t be surprised if job security and keeping workers ‘gainfully employed’ has something to do with it as well (this also applies to Windows itself and most other major software too, I’ll bet).

      Also, (and yes, I’m also looking at you, Firefox) I don’t need a new tab opening up every time there’s a major version update telling me”Your browser has been updated to the latest version” and/or “What’s New”. Edge is also extra annoying in this regard because the new tabs don’t usually open after Edge is restarted following an update but one or two restarts later.

      It’s getting to the stage where I’m going to implement a “Browser Patch Day” for Edge and Firefox and just update them once a month, like “Patch Tuesday” for Windows and keep them ‘locked down’ in between patch days.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: August 2023 updates are out #2578776

      PC1 in my signature (the “supported” one) now updated with no issues so far.

      Both PC’s now ‘locked down’ Windows Update wise until next month before the inevitable “Preview” updates start rolling out, I am not and do not want to be an unpaid tester for MS or anyone else. I can usually hide them with Windows Update Manager (wumgr) of course.

      One of these Patch Tuesdays I am looking forward to MS finally fixing the ‘bug’ which has been in Windows 10 for years and has carried over to Windows 11 where USB connected printers ‘disappear’ from the list of available printers if they’re not switched on for a week or so.

      The drivers are still there and the printer(s) reappear when they’re switched on again but it’s a bit of a nuisance when the default printer changes to Microsoft Print to PDF after the USB printer ‘disappears’ and you haven’t noticed and you then wonder why nothing happens when you try to print something (the default printer needs to be manually changed back to the USB printer after it ‘reappears’ when you turn it on).

      I do remember reading something a couple of years back where MS apparently have some idea as to why this happens but they don’t know how to fix it so far. Sounds about right.

      Perhaps they might want to consider devoting a bit more time and a few more staff to finding a solution to this instead of adding more and more pointless junk to Edge? But, I’ll leave my rant about browsers (Edge, Firefox and Chrome especially) and their never ending weekly ‘stream’ of  (mostly unwanted and useless) updates for another time and place.

       

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: August 2023 updates are out #2578547

      Not really any specific reason.

      Perhaps I don’t really trust MS with what they might consider to be “malicious software” because I seem to recall in the early days of Windows 10 a lot of people were having issues with non malicious software like CCleaner being removed by Windows with no warning whatsoever.

      I don’t think it was the Malicious Software Removal Tool that was doing it though – from memory it was happening during an upgrade to the latest Windows 10 version or upgrades to Windows 10 from Windows 7 or 8.1 but I would still prefer to be safe rather than sorry.

       

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: August 2023 updates are out #2578519

      Crash Test Dummy #1 here.

      Did the updates for “unsupported” PC2 in my signature with Windows 11 Home after making a Macrium Reflect backup first (of course).

      Had a .NET update, the usual Monthly Cumulative Update and a Microsoft Defender Update.

      Don’t know if there was a Malicious Software Removal Tool update because I have those blocked.

      No problems apparent so far. No “unsupported” message or anything like that. Will connect up “supported” PC1 tomorrow and see how that goes when I update it.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • Seriously, Microsoft.

      Just. Stop. It.

      If people want to install Windows 11 on “unsupported hardware” then let them do it but tell them they do it at their own ‘risk’ and they won’t get any help from MS if something does get messed up. After all, haven’t most of us been taking risks with installing Windows with nearly every version since Windows 1.0?

      As I said in my last post, Windows 11 is running perfectly fine on a 10 year old system here (PC2 in my signature) and if all of these “restrictions” are supposed to be about security then why does Windows 11 still have a ‘truckload’ of security updates every month just like Windows 10?

      Let’s face it – I’m sure most people know by now that it’s more about selling more PC’s and PC hardware with Windows 11’s “restrictions” than it is about security.

      At this stage we probably don’t know if this will affect “unsupported” PC’s with Windows 11 already installed like the one I’m using now (it’ll probably happen when the next ‘big’ update appears later this year) but if it does mess up this PC and there are no workarounds then I’ll just put Windows 10 back on it… or maybe Linux.

      PC1 in my signature can stay on Windows 11 because it is “supported”.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Windows Defender not updating on Windows 7 and 8.1 #2577329

      Oh, I’m always prepared to give Microsoft the benefit of the doubt but I still have fond memories of many Windows 7 users sitting and looking at a “Checking for Updates”  message on their screens for hours or sometimes even days when using Windows Update not long after Windows 10 was released.

      It even started “affecting” Windows 8.1 as well.

      MS did eventually release a “fix” for it, but it took them a long, long time (and lots and lots of complaints) before they finally did it.

      This was followed by the infamous “Unsupported Hardware” message that greeted Windows 7  (and I believe 8.1 as well) users with a 7th generation and above CPU when trying to access Windows Update. There was a simple workaround to enable updates with these CPU’s and Windows 7 and 8.1 worked fine after they were updated.

      Their latest shenanigans is the hardware requirements for Window 11. I’m typing this post using a PC with an ASUS H81M-PLUS motherboard and a 4th generation CPU which were both released about 10 years ago. It has Windows 11 Home (22H2 build 22621.1992) on it and works perfectly fine.

      The next thing I’ll be watching out for is any “weirdness” that starts happening with Windows 10 as it approaches “end of support” in just over 2 years time. I’ve already had a couple of people tell me they’ve noticed a few small “odd” things happening with their W10 installs lately, but at this stage I might just put that down to “user error”. For now anyway.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Windows 10 22H2 – the stable version #2555575

      This actually seems like a good thing… no more randomly added nonsense that no-one ever asked for?

      Stability at last, until 2025?

      Yep, that’s absolutely fine by me.

      Yes, we have Edge for that now (randomly added nonsense that no-one ever asked for).

      I use Firefox most of the time but I still update Edge regularly and after every update I usually go though Settings to check and see if anything new that I didn’t want and will probably never use has been added (and is always turned on by default, of course).

      Nice to finally have a ‘stable’ version of Windows 10 though.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • I bought a little Lenovo 11″ laptop last year which had Windows 10 “S mode” on it.

      I opened a Microsoft account, got out of S mode which converted the OS to Windows 10 Home and then I deleted the Microsoft account shortly thereafter.

      Ended up doing a clean install of Windows 10 Home from the downloaded ISO file not long after that… I wonder if that was all I needed to do in the first place?

      In other words – if I didn’t open a Microsoft account to get the laptop out of S mode and just did a clean install right from the start would the laptop still have been in S mode?

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: What to do first with Windows 11 #2467534

      I’ve recently upgraded my 2 main PC’s (see my signature) to Windows 11 Home, PC2 is unsupported, of course but it is running fine. Both of them are so far after doing a bit of the usual ‘tweaking’ (which mostly involves turning a lot of things off that are turned on by default) and using O&O’s ShutUp 10/11 and a couple of other ‘apps’ to control Windows Updates, etc.

      Couple of minor ‘niggles’.

      Does anyone know how to get rid of Get Started from the Start Menu? There is a long thread about this on the Windows 11 forums but so far no one has figured out how to do it.

      https://www.elevenforum.com/t/getting-rid-of-get-started.1521/

      I don’t care about removing the app or whatever it links to, I would just like to remove the Start Menu icon. I hate it when MS does things like this. I just ignore it for now.

      I’ve also noticed the Windows 10 printer ‘bug’ of  printers that are not turned on for about a week ‘disappearing’ from the list of available printers has carried across to Windows 11. The drivers, etc. are still there and turning the printer on makes it ‘reappear’ again.

      I suspect it is only USB connected printers that are affected by this but I’m not too sure? My other printer is connected by ethernet cable to the router and that hasn’t ‘disappeared’ yet (I only have a USB option for the other printer).

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: December 2021 Patch Tuesday arrives – say goodbye to 2004 #2406860

      PC #1 updated with no problems.

      Also updated my little Lenovo laptop with Windows 10 Home. No problems there so far as well.

      Macrium images were made before updating, of course.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: December 2021 Patch Tuesday arrives – say goodbye to 2004 #2406432

      PC #2 updated with no problems so far. Macrium Reflect images made before updating, of course.

      I’ll connect up PC #1 in the next day or two and update that.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: 21H2 is finally out #2402669

      Connected up my second PC with Windows 10 Home yesterday and updated it to 21H2 – it still wasn’t offered by Windows Update so I had to use the Registry ‘trick’ to make it appear (I deleted the 2 required Registry keys after the update was done – same as I also deleted the extra entries in gpedit after updating my Windows 10 Professional machine a couple of days back.

      And, I also updated my little Lenovo 11 inch laptop which has Windows 10 Home this morning (about 2 hours ago), had to use the Registry ‘trick’ with that as well to get 21H2.

      You never know, Perth (and possibly the rest of Australia) may be offered the update (without having to jump through ‘hoops’) before Christmas.

      Everything is running smoothly on all 3 machines so far.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: 21H2 is finally out #2402460

      Still no sign of 21H2 after checking Windows Update again so I went into gpedit and set the target version to 21H2 (it wasn’t configured for anything), rebooted and lo and behold – it appeared!

      Took about a minute to download and install as opposed to about half an hour for the ISO file or the Upgrade Assistant which can be downloaded from MS (these methods also appear to ‘overwrite’ a large number of Windows files unnecessarily which is probably why they take so long – I did try this method yesterday but I wasn’t 100% happy with it so I restored a Macrium image before using the target release method).

      This was for my Windows 10 Professional PC, of course.No problems so far, the only thing that seems to have changed is the Windows 10 version description (now Version 21H2 OS Build 19044.1348).

      I’ll connect up the other PC with Windows 10 Home sometime in the next few days but if 21H2 hasn’t appeared by then I’ll have to use the Registry method to set the target release version to 21H2 since Home doesn’t have gpedit, of course.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: 21H2 is finally out #2402241

      I guess we’re not considered ‘worthy’ yet in Perth, Western Australia because its now Thursday morning here and still no sign of 21H2 when I check Windows Update after I also checked several times during the day yesterday.

      I do have the 21H2 ISO file downloaded and I suppose I could update my 2 PC’s with that but it seems to be a long, drawn out process compared with using Windows Update. I’ll probably wait a little longer.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    • in reply to: November patches here we come #2400876

      Actually, I need to start paying more attention on Patch Tuesdays. That PC Health Check is a separate update – KB5005463 (4.39 MB).

      I went back and restored a Macrium Reflect image that I made before I ran Windows Update yesterday then ran Windows Update again and this time I’ve hidden KB5005463 (thank goodness for Update Manager for Windows – WuMgr, especially with Windows 10 Home).

      The reason I’ve gone to all this trouble is because after I uninstalled KB5005463 yesterday I noticed there were about a dozen registry entries left behind according to CCleaner and I don’t want any little ‘surprises’ suddenly popping up even after I removed them.

      Gigabyte B560M D2V Motherboard, Intel i5 11400 CPU, 16GB RAM, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1650 Graphics Card, 1x Samsung 870 EVO 250GB SSD, 1x Samsung 860 EVO 250GB SSD, Windows 10 Professional 22H2 64bit.

    Viewing 15 replies - 16 through 30 (of 240 total)