• Ed Tittel

    Ed Tittel

    @edtittel

    Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
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    • in reply to: The state of OneDrive #2634627

      Here again other members have beat me to the punch, but you should also find this Google search “site:Askwoody.com disable onedrive” interesting as well. As I mentioned in my previous reply to Zathras, many individuals and organizations disable/turn off OneDrive altogether.

      Thanks for your comment.

      –Ed–

       

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: The state of OneDrive #2634624

      Zathras: I feel your pain, as do many other Windows users. As another member has alredy pointed out (thanks Alex 5723!) you can indeed disable OneDrive notifications. There are many users (and organizations) that disable OneDrive to make use of other cloud-based storage services.

      Thanks for your comment!

      –Ed–

       

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Microsoft Photos, Photos Legacy, and Windows 10 #2618193

      Dear rChaz: Thanks for your color management comments. That’s where my expertise in managing and editing photos starts to fall off. But for those who must attend to such things, I get that it’s really important. So thanks again for sharing your helpful observations. Happy New Year, too!

      –Ed–

    • in reply to: Microsoft Photos, Photos Legacy, and Windows 10 #2608688

      Another story on this has come out at https://www.windowslatest.com/2023/12/05/windows-24h2-spotted-as-windows-12-is-rumoured-to-launch-in-2024/. The one I was talking about was https://www.ghacks.net/2023/12/02/windows-11-24h2-and-windows-12-expected-in-2024/. FWIW, I agree with Mayank Pamar at WindowsLatest that a “Windows 12” in 2024 is pretty unlikely. But you can see what these pundits have said for yourself. Wasn’t sure about posting links to other websites here in comments. If somebody wants to offer guidance on that, do please share same here.

      Thanks,

      –Ed–

    • in reply to: Microsoft Photos, Photos Legacy, and Windows 10 #2608410

      Very interesting. Do you perhaps have a policy enjoining Store updates? That’s the usual pathway for the “new” Photos app to appear in Windows 10. If there’s something in the way of such routine updates, that could explain this apparent discrepancy. OTOH, with Windows, it could easily be something else. If you’re just reporting status, thanks for doing so. If you want some help figuring out why you’re still hanging back, please tell me what version of Windows 10 you’re running (Edition and Build number) and whether or not it’s inside some kind of company/corporate managed environment or not.

      Thanks for your comment.

      –Ed–

    • in reply to: Microsoft Photos, Photos Legacy, and Windows 10 #2608310

      Thanks for your observation. I agree with your impressions of Windows 10. And indeed, over at Ghacks.net, Martin Brinkmann floated some fairly strong rumors that “Windows 12” could ship in 2024. To me, that speaks of a possible leapfrog effect from 10 to 12, if such a thing could occur. The topic of “Windows Succession” is almost as odd and unpredictable as the recently completed TV series of the same name!

      Thanks again for posting,

      –Ed–

    • in reply to: Introducing Microsoft PC Manager #2597289

      Already found & fixed that typo. Thanks for the feedback. My English, I’ll have you know, it not fractured: it’s dead broke! =Ed=

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Introducing Microsoft PC Manager #2597273

      I blogged about this new PCM version over at edtittel.com this morning, along with some perhaps-interesting screen shots of the new logo and UI that have come along for that ride. Find it online at https://www.edtittel.com/blog/pc-manager-beta-version-3-8-1-0-is-out.html.

      HTH,

      –Ed–

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Introducing Microsoft PC Manager #2597212

      Wow! Lots of traffic on a tangential thread — managing drivers is not really part of what PC Manager does, but it does incite plenty of passion and interest. Thanks for all the great posts. I’ve learned a thing or two. The SDIO version is the one that most experienced Snappy users prefer, AFAIK. Find it at the Glenn Delahoy Snappy Driver Installer Origin site (https://www.snappy-driver-installer.org/).

      On the original topic, MS just released a new version of PC Manager yesterday (October 25). I don’t see that the home page has changed (the new logo clearly says “Beta” in the upper left corner and I don’t see that on the download page right now). I got my upgrade through winget where its ID is Microsoft.PCManager.CN. Thus, the syntax:

      winget upgrade –id Microsoft.PCManager.CN

      Should work.

      Just to make sure I went ahead and downloaded the installer from the home page. It’s the old version (it shows up in winget as 3.1.3.0 whereas the newer version is numbered 3.8.1.0). If you want to try the new one out, use the winget approach instead. To install that version using winget the syntax is:

      winget install –id Microsoft.PCManager.CN

      I’ll also note that the old installer happily overwrote the newer version with nary a warning. Sigh.

      –Ed–

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    • in reply to: Introducing Microsoft PC Manager #2596507

      Nothing seems to stir Windows users’ passions more than how best to update device drivers. Corollary to this is use of tools to deal with same. Personally, I am a fan of the safe fork for Snappy Driver installer, but many experts believe if you don’t want the drivers from MS, you should get them only from their makers.

      Hope you find an approach that works for you and your PCs.

      Best wishes & thanks for asking,

      –Ed–

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Introducing Microsoft PC Manager #2596506

      Dear EricB:

      Never meant to suggest that readers should blindly agree to anything. Thanks for pointing that out. I was explaining mechanics, not legal jeopardy or torts. Again: thanks!

      –Ed–

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Apps vs. applications #2595164

      Dear EricB:
      You make some good points. Thanks for sharing them with us.
      –Ed–

    • in reply to: Apps vs. applications #2594990

      Dear Wdyblash:
      Thanks for your response and your questions. I’ll repeat them in abbreviated form, then provide such answers as I can.

      1. UWP auto-updates: Most such apps come from the MS Store (or a similar “source” in the winget lexicon). MS Store apps are usually checked daily in the background, and updated whenever they need it (a newer version is in the store than on your PC).

      2. Do .exe programs get auto-updates? Depends on the application: some — MS Office is a good example — have an update check & apply function. This can be configured to be periodic and automatic, or periodic and provide only notification. Thus, the answer is maybe yes, maybe no depending on the application.

      3. Will a .exe program cease to function if the underlying APIs are modified or deleted? Most likely, yes but that depends on if and when such APIs get called. If they’re not called, they probably won’t affect the rest of the application’s runtime environment. If they do get called, they could cause the application to throw an error (if the code includes robust error handling) or crash (if it doesn’t). Again, it depends on the application.

      4. Do UWP or .exe apps/applications depend on access to some server somewhere? Again, it depends. Many, but not all, applications interact with servers on a regular basis (especially for updates). As to whether that access is required or not — think of an application that reads a database on a remote server — it depends on the application. Some may not run without such access, others may offer reduced functionality without such access, and still others may be unaffected.

      5. Internet access is kind of a special case for server access. It’s pretty routine for all kinds of stuff nowadays.

      You raise some interesting concerns. I hope I’ve been able to address them. Thanks again for writing.

      –Ed–

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    • in reply to: Thunderbolt #2592761

      Thanks for sharing your results with us. I’ve never seen what you report myself before, but I have read about it from time to time. Good to know that what sometimes works with newer, faster devices, ports and cables doesn’t always do that with older, slower stuff.

      Best wishes,

      –Ed–

    • in reply to: Thunderbolt #2592760

      My thanks in turn to all who found this article worth reading. It’s been fascinating for me, too, to try to untangle the twisted threads that tie USB (especially USB-C) and Thunderbolt together. Best wishes to all,
      –Ed–

    Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)