• Elly

    Elly

    @elly

    Viewing 15 replies - 31 through 45 (of 1,099 total)
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    • After an update is hidden, it still needs to be cleared from the queue… and that happens the next time Windows Update looks for updates. Until that happens, it shows up under Windows Update, and will be installed if you ‘check’ for updates, or download and install them. If you want to clear the queue faster than that, go to How to clear the windows update queue in W10 and follow the instructions there. It is easiest just to wait and let it clear itself.

      Also, when you unpause, all the updates that are in the queue are downloaded and installed. That includes any you might have hidden, but which are still in the queue.

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

    • in reply to: 2000013: How to clear the Windows Update queue in Win10 #2287274

      The reason for using metered connections is that you can slow/limit what is downloaded… which can be useful, especially for Home, as they usually have time to run wushowhide and hide any unwanted updates. Pro, with the 2 setting, isn’t downloading anything until you click on download.

      My desktop went without checking for updates itself for six days after I had hid July’s updates and tried to clear the queue manually twice, and gave up. When it finally checked, the hidden updates disappeared from the queue, and were no longer at risk of being installed. Six days. I should have documented with screen shots! I didn’t touch the download button… and eventually the queue cleared. It was fine, long before Woody cleared the July updates for installation.

      I’m one of those that don’t shut down often. I don’t think that W10 installs anything when Pro is set to 2 and you shut down/boot up… but can’t say for certain.

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: 2000013: How to clear the Windows Update queue in Win10 #2287226

      Sorry to rock the boat but this outcome has always worked for me with great success each time as I don’t wish to wait hours or days to update

      I would be very interested to hear from anyone else regarding this part of the procedure.

      By failing to wait, and un-Pausing, all you did was install any available updates in your queue. They disappear from your queue, because they have been installed.

      Running wushowhide does not result in the unwanted updates disappearing from the update queue until Windows Update looks for updates again… which is why you wait.

      It sounds like you don’t have any problems with the new updates, but the procedure you describe installs them, not avoids them.

      I’d advise anyone truly wanting to hide certain updates to follow the procedure that PKCano sets out.

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: How to use wushowhide #2286054

      Double check with wushowhide- are they still hidden?

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      mpw
    • in reply to: How to use wushowhide #2286051

      If you don’t uncheck advanced, then it ‘applies repairs automatically’… and I’m too much of a chicken to find out what that means on my system!

      I do use wushowhide any time I have questions about what updates are available, and what updates I have hidden.

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: How to use wushowhide #2286044

      Make sure that you uncheck the advanced option each time you run wushowhide, because it may ‘apply repairs’ automatically, that you didn’t intend.

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      mpw
    • in reply to: How to use wushowhide #2286039

      @Mpw-

      You can still hide KB 4562900 with wushowhide, and just don’t click the download button, and eventually it will disappear from your Windows Update queue, just like you did before.

      Windows Update will keep sending updates your way… but now you have the tools and knowledge to manage them…

      You don’t NEED any more updates (I’d check out the ones from HP, just in case) this month, so you don’t have to rush things by clearing the queue. Eventually Windows Update will check for updates on its own, and any that you’ve hidden will disappear… no stress!

      So- use it as practice as @Coldheart9020 says, or hide and ignore it… your choice.

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: W10 – This product is licensed to OOPS! #2286033

      Hi Steve, and welcome!

      What I’d do is get an ISO for 1909 from Heidoc (you probably should be updating from 1809, now anyways), for W10 Pro… and do a clean install, off line.

      Make a local account by saying you don’t have the required information…

      It is easy to do now, since you just got the computer. I’m non-techy, but have done a number of clean installs, and it isn’t difficult (don’t save anything, when given the option)… and not too different than what you’d do to update to the most stable version of W10 right now.

      Definitely leave that e-mail and Microsoft account behind you!

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Hello! Has anyone seen 2004? #2286003

      Go ahead and post, logged in…

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: The New Edge Forced Down My Throat #2285927

      If you remove chromium Edge, you will get legacy Edge back… but you will still have Edge, in one form or another…

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

    • Click to run will require you to turn on the updating manually… just do it at the same time.

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

    • If you read the full initial post, and click on the linked article in ComputerWorld, where Woody gives full instructions, you will see the title of his article is “Despite an unexpected monkey wrench, now is the time to install the July Windows and Office patches“.

      If you have “Receive updates for other Microsoft products when you update Windows” turned on, as Woody recommends (it is found under advanced settings), then you will find it easy to do all your updating at one time. Any major problems are always covered by Woody in his linked ComputerWorld article at the time he recommends updating.

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • No, the meeting is done when the last person exits. Individual people can leave/join/rejoin as long as at least one person is still in the meeting.

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

    • Hello @Razz-

      Jitsi Meet is designed for privacy by default. You are not required to establish an account to use it.

      A meeting only exists from the time the first person joins, until the last person leaves.

      Any names, e-mail addresses or profile pictures are only transmitted to the other participants in the meeting… and are not saved once the meeting ends.

      The end to end encryption (e2ee) is for chrome based browsers (Chromium 83 and up).

      Since I’ve only used Jitsi Meet for family chats, and most of the family are FaceBook users who put their info out anyways, I haven’t changed browsers in order to use end to end encryption. The video and audio is encrypted when sent over the network, even without e2ee… they are never stored to any persistent storage… and since only people who have the meeting name, and password, as well as the time set for the meeting will be able to join, I’m not terribly worried about it.

      The biggest limitations of e2ee is that server provided options such as recording, live streaming, and phone participation are disabled. Several family use the phone to access, so that is another reason not to use, at this point.

      To be truly secure, one would need to install Jitsi on one’s own server, rather than using Jitsi Meet… but I figure the risk of any video or voice data being accessed at the ‘bridge’ points, as well as the relatively benign information being discussed, makes it relatively unimportant in my personal use scenario. The Jitsi Meet people are not collecting data, to be collated over time, and then designing advertising around it, or selling it…

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

    • in reply to: Dell Support Assist Remediation on Windows 10 #2284719

      So… here is a link to a number of more complex ways to change permissions so you can delete the files, without using a third party app.

      Non-techy Win 10 Pro and Linux Mint experimenter

    Viewing 15 replies - 31 through 45 (of 1,099 total)