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  • hitokage

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)
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    • in reply to: Patch Lady – seen on a movie screen #1951484
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      There has been talk about the loudness of movies for over twenty years. Part of what was found to be happening were the people mixing the audio were losing their hearing and doing things to increase the apparent loudness. There have been papers about it and there always mentions of something being done, but it seems to still not have happened.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Patch Lady – seen on a movie screen #1951482
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      Movie are still produced in the 2.39:1 aspect ratio, which is the same aspect ratio used for anamorphic (aka CinemaScope or scope) movies on film. With the other predominant aspect ratio being 1.85:1 (aka flat). This means that some movies still get cropped when they get a home release, since widescreen TVs are 16:9 (aka 1.78:1).

      This is very likely occurred between showings. Once upon a time this type of ad were done with slides, and were run until the show was started. Once the show was started you would sometimes get ads/commercials (some studios prohibited this – such as Disney) along with movie trailers, and then the actual movie. The length and amount of pre-show material will vary depending on the theatre/theatre chain’s policies.

      in reply to: Patch Lady – seen on a movie screen #1950809
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      Having worked in a movie theatre in the past I’ve got a bit to add.

      First, any preshow advertisements are separate from the computer equipment used for the movie, with the only thing possibly shared is the projector itself. The movie studios go through a great deal of trouble to try to prevent the possibility of digital copies being made of their movies – especially while they are still in the theatre. Because of the high cost of digital cinema equipment the theatre may not even own the projector and/or the computer equipment (depends on the size of the theatre chain).

      The equipment for advertising is also generally not owned by the movie theatre, but an outside company. It quite likely was installed when digital cinema was being rolled-out, and that would mean XP (which does include Active Desktop) was still the standard. While it’s possibly connected to the internet, some advertising companies are likely sending either a DVD or USB drive that either gets run from directly or runs a script to update/change the advertisements.

      While ticket prices are set by a theatre or theatre chain, it needs to be understood that they may be getting as little as 10% of the price of each ticket. This is why concessions are expensive – it’s how they pay the bills – which are many and definitely not cheap.

      5 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Patch Lady – Chrome is out…what’s in? #1934213
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      Browser memory use is based on each web page, and has increased because the amount of stuff web pages are doing – scripts, images/animations, movies, etc. The worst offenders are the web pages that are endless – instead of splitting stuff up onto separate pages, you continually scroll down forever until you reach the end of the content.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Patch Lady – free isn’t free #1923472
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      A fully patched current OS, smartphone, tablet, iPad, or Chromebook isn’t necessarily going to keep you safe. Web-based phishing sites can work on any platform – patched or not.

      It’s also possible to have malware on Android/Chromebook devices and Apple iOS devices. You may not have administrator/root type permissions (aka privileged access), but that doesn’t mean something malicious can’t and therefore go undetected. There are various methods to get root access on Android. Apple has also had issues with privileged access being possible – recently they released an update (iOS 12.4) that didn’t include a patch for a bug they had fixed previously allowing privileged access.

      in reply to: Bill Nye, Chromebooks, and common sense #1908655
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      Fixed it (otherwise it would have bothered me forever). I usually catch those kind of typos and edit my posts – sometimes multiple times. I got it right when I typed it in the Tags section though.

      in reply to: Bill Nye, Chromebooks, and common sense #1908411
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      You mean Bill Nye the mechanical engineer (BS from Cornell), who left Boeing to become a comedian, and then became a TV personality – all his science degrees are honorary.

      • This reply was modified 10 months, 3 weeks ago by hitokage. Reason: typo
      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Patch Lady – when patches aren’t managed #1834275
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      It may not be a DOS error, but a BIOS/EFI error. Anyway it very likely only displays ads and has no connection to the operation of the elevator at all.

      in reply to: Patch Lady – when patches aren’t managed #1805672
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      There is a IoT (Internet of Things) version of Windows 10 that is the replacement for Windows Embedded. I would think it has these kind of pop-ups disabled, but I’m not personally familiar with it.

      Black Box (to name one off the top of my head) and several other vendors have off the shelf products for digital signage that don’t use Windows.

      The problem here is the lack of understanding what to use in certain applications, and keeping things simple. Understanding that the hardware and software lifecycle is different in certain environments from a typical desktop, laptop, tablet, or cellphone. These things are meant to just work, and rarely get touched after being deployed.

      in reply to: Patch Lady – when patches aren’t managed #1796045
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      This is an example of using a high-tech solution where it isn’t needed. Do the tenants change there that often? Even if it displays some kind of advertising or other frequently changing information as well, that could still be placed separately on a monitor.

      in reply to: Windows 10 Home Ultra #1752082
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      To follow up to b’s post – most people do remember Windows 7 Home Premium, as that’s what most machines shipped with if they didn’t get Professional.

      Also, Ultimate was the only way to legally have Windows 7 Enterprise without a volume licensing agreement. So if you wanted any of those features it was the only option.

      As far as Windows 10 Ultra, no one can know for sure since Microsoft would likely deny it whether it existed or not if they weren’t ready to officially announce it.

      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      It’s possible that Windows 7 Home Premium is affected as well since it does have Remote Assistance, which is a limited/restricted version of RDP, and likely uses most of the same back-end.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      Frequent upgrades to software is nonsense. There haven’t been any incredible improvements in years, making new versions an incredibly boring thing, and just a headache for not much in return. They need to go back to concentrating on fixing what they have, save the real improvements and new features up, and then release a new version – which is what they used to do before and in the earlier days of the internet. Kind of like cars are handled – new model, refinement and minor changes, and then after a few years do a fresh updated design with new features. Currently they ship garbage at (or close to) a deadline, fix it later, and say that’s progress.

      Make software exciting again!

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Oil Filters #243293
      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      Here is a website I bookmarked way back in 2003 that has a tear-down of application equivalent oil filters from various manufacturers. Oil Filters Revealed

      The page was created Russ W. Knize in 1999 and updated in 2008. Things may have changed since then, but it seems the Fram filters are still the same. What is interesting to me is if the cardboard endcaps aren’t problematic in some way, why are they the only ones using them?

      hitokage
      AskWoody Lounger

      MSRT was originally created for XP. Maybe the EULA is in there more than once for some reason, and this second copy was never replaced – appearing in certain circumstances? Or it could be that part of the build process is to grab a copy of the current EULA text, and if there’s an error use the default?

    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 23 total)