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  • jackpet

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    • in reply to: How to manage your router – Part II #2084051

      jackpet
      AskWoody Plus

      I have found it particularly useful to reserve the IP addresses of the devices on my home network.  This stops DHCP from changing them.  I then go and create direct shortcuts to these devices.  It’s faster and more foolproof than using the Windows network way to access these devices.

      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by  jackpet.
    • in reply to: Update BIOS? If it ain't broke…… #2011775

      jackpet
      AskWoody Plus

      I have never found updating a bios is worth the risk.  I say this even though I have updated bioses in the past with no ill effects.  Yet updating did absolutely NOTHING as far as performance was concerned.  I eventually came to the conclusion that I was taking a big risk for little gain.  Unless you have a significant problem that a bios update promises to fix, I wouldn’t do it.  One final thing… I’ve never heard of a Windows update requiring a Bios update.  Are you certain about this?

    • in reply to: What am i doing wrong? (Networking problems) #1864370

      jackpet
      AskWoody Plus

      Makes me angry that Microsoft got rid of homegroup.  My network connectivity has now been  *spotty* (some days working, some days not) until I did the following:

      1 – Obviously, make sure sharing is on for the folders you want available on your network.

      2 – Make sure your smb settings are on in Programs and Features as outlined above.

      3 – Use the ipconfig command in the command prompt to find the lan ip for each of your networked computers.  (In Linux, it’d be the ifconfig or ip command).  It will look like this for any of you newbies out there – 192.168.0.xx  where xx is the specific number to each of your specific computers.  In my case, the range of xx could be any number between 10 and 200.

      4 – In the start menu search box of your main computer, type in the address of the machine you want to access exactly like this (without the quotes):   “\\192.168.0.xx”   (Make sure the slashes are as shown here and xx is a number.)  Create a folder (I called mine “Network” and create a specific shortcut to each \\192.169.0.xx you just accessed.  Of course, I then renamed the shortcuts to the names of the individual computers.)  This never fails.  You will open the networked folder *even if Windows is not seeing the networked computer.*    Now the problem is that your router is dynamically assigning ip addresses to your networked computers, changing the xx number every week or so in my case.  But we have a solution even for this.

      5 – You now need to know how to access your router.  Again, it has a local lan ip which in my case and in most cases is 192.168.0.1  Type this number in your browser to access your router.  You can find the username and password for your router by googling its model name and number.

      Almost all routers will allow you to *reserve* ip addressess.  (Important note: This is not the same as assigning a static ip address.  That would cause conflicts down the road.)   It merely means the router will not attempt to assign any different xx number to a machine that you have reserved a specific number for.  In my Hitron modem, I found the desired control under BASIC – DHCP RESERVATION.  I then reserved the xx numbers currently assigned to my 4 networked computers (one of them running Manjaro Linux), making these numbers permanent to their specific machine.  (The procedure for doing so was simple in my case – all point and click).

      You will have to repeat the above procedure on all of the networked computers that you wish to control the network from, if you want to have “2-way access.”  I had to do this in 3 of my 4 computers.  My wife doesn’t network from the 4th one so there was no need to give her the capability to access the other 3, but of course, there is still “1-way access” to her computer.

      I repeat.  *This never fails to open the desired shared network folder* even when Windows is being “finicky” and not allowing me to network otherwise.  (BTW FYI  The same trick works in Manjaro if you type “smb://192.168.0.xx” in your Thunar folder address box.  Of course, Samba has to have been enabled.)

      Hope this helps.  It may sound complicated for some but it’s not really.

    • in reply to: Winaero Tweaker with W10 Improvements #1862462

      jackpet
      AskWoody Plus

      For some strange reason, Winaero kills my media streaming.  I’ve tested this thoroughly.  I don’t even have to make a single tweak in the program.  Just installing it immediately kills my media streaming.


    • jackpet
      AskWoody Plus

      It’s outrageous that employees are not taught the simple procedures to avoid enacting the encrypting software of ransomware.  It should be part of their basic training. 

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