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  • jburk07

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 113 total)
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    • in reply to: Kernel updates in Mint Update Manager #1999624

      jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      Just fyi, the Update Manager in Mint 19.2 no longer categorizes updates according to Levels. It does still identify security updates vs software updates, with kernel updates as a separate category.

      That said, I’m a newbie in Linux but haven’t had any problems so far just taking all the updates in 19.2, including kernel updates (in the 4.15 series). Of course, this isn’t my primary computer, and it wouldn’t be too difficult just to reinstall Mint. I do use Timeshift and have successfully done a restore before, on a different computer.

      I still need to look into learning about Clonezilla, which I’ve been putting off because it looks a little complicated. I use Macrium Reflect for Windows.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by  jburk07.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: MS-DEFCON 4: It’s time to get patched #1998497

      jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      Reporting successful Group A updating results:

      Last month I installed the September rollup KB4516065 and the updated SHA-2 update KB4474419 on both of our Windows 7 x64 laptops on October 3, in that brief space between Defcon 3 and back to 1. I also installed the Servicing Stack Update KB4516655 from Windows Update after the out-of-band rollup KB4524157 disappeared.

      So yesterday I installed the October rollup KB4519976 on both laptops without problems. I didn’t experience the longer-than-usual installations or reboots that some did.

      One of the laptops was offered the .NET rollup KB4524102, which also installed without a problem. The various Office 2010 and 2013 didn’t present any difficulties, either.

      All anti-telemetry settings are still in place after the updates.

      So I guess that just leaves November, December, and January to go, unless 0Patch proves to be a workable resource. (Or unless that TLS bug hits us later.) As always, I’m thankful to everyone here for their help. Good luck to all on getting through another patching month.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 4 days ago by  jburk07.
      6 users thanked author for this post.

    • jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      @mn-,
      OK, thanks for all the great information. I will look into that linked guide again a little further to get a better sense of things, but I think ultimately the whole process is a little beyond me for now.

      I might want to try this approach on the HP at some point since there’s no way to switch it to AHCI anyway and since it looks like I could recover from a mistake with an image backup, or the cloned SSD I have, or with the set of recovery disks (I like to have multiple backups …).

      The HP has Intel Rapid Storage Technology, which might be what’s supposed to manage the RAID since that’s apparently where the iaStor.sys driver comes from, which the controller is using. When I look in the IRST application, it shows the disk usage as “Available” rather than “Array disk,” and I don’t see “Manage Array” anywhere, so I don’t know if there’s an array already set up. The thought of also setting up an array is pretty daunting.

      Plus I still have to decide which of the current partitions to delete from the disk to begin with since it already has 4 primary. On the older computers, the Mint installer set up Mint in a logical partition even though there were only 2 existing primary partitions. Of course, I have no idea how that might work if there’s a RAID array.

      So right now I’ll just keep learning more about Linux first and maybe see if I might be able to get a refurbished Windows 8.1 laptop to play with. At least now I know to look for something like another Dell Latitude so I *can* switch it to AHCI.

      Thanks for all your help. Your explanations and guidance have really helped me get a handle on things, and I will hold on to this information for later.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge


    • jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      @mn-,

      A couple more questions, thanking you in advance for your patience:

      If I successfully install mdadm on the live USB,
      and if I run the … –assemble –scan terminal command,
      but there isn’t an existing array, will it just give me an error message? (In other words, no harm done?)

      Also, if these steps work and I can see the internal disk and the Windows partitions, and successfully install Mint, would I then use a similar terminal command using the live USB to install mdadm into the installed system? Or would it be more complicated?

      And then there’s “recreating the boot configuration ….” Is that something that’s done (hopefully) using terminal commands? I’ve used the SuperGrub2 utility before and it worked well. I haven’t edited the grub directly, though.

      Just trying to get a feel for what I might be getting into, haha.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge


    • jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      Well, what a circus. Here’s my report:

      Like Tex265 and others, I was about to install the September rollup KB4516065 and updated SHA-2 KB4474419 on one of our Win7 laptops when I discovered those patches had suddenly been replaced by the out-of-band KB4524157.

      After I hid KB4524157 and re-checked for updates, the 2 September patches (rollup and SHA-2) reappeared. (The .NET update hadn’t been offered on that machine.) I installed those 2 September updates, rebooted, installed the September Office updates, and unhid the out-of-band KB4524157 as we await further information and advice.

      Our other Win7 laptop worked about the same, except that the two September updates (rollup and updated SHA-2) were still in Windows Update, along with the .NET update. I installed just those two. After the restart, the new out-of-band update showed up in Windows Update, and .NET KB4514602 was still there. So I installed just the .NET, rebooted, and then installed the Office updates.

      I haven’t seen any problems so far.
      My anti-telemetry settings are still intact after the updates.

      I was tempted to hide KB4524157 again, along with the unchecked October Outlook update, just to see if the Servicing Stack Update KB4516655 would appear, but I decided that would be a bridge too far. I’ll wait until after we see how things shake out.

      Thanks to everyone here for all the information and advice, as always. Good luck to those who are still wading through the mess.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge

      5 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Kernel updates in Mint Update Manager #2000177

      jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      Great, thanks for confirming that.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge

    • in reply to: Kernel updates in Mint Update Manager #1999974

      jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      @ascaris wrote:
      “It still required booting to Windows or the Reflect rescue media to perform each backup, which was a pain.”

      Ascaris,
      Thanks for this information about your use of kernels, and especially for the reminder that I could use the Macrium Reflect rescue media to make a Reflect backup of Linux. I’m dual-booting Linux Mint and Windows XP, which has an older version of Macrium Reflect; but since XP can’t recognize my GPT external hard disks, I had been thinking I couldn’t use them for backups and would have to re-format one as FAT32 in order to use Macrium Reflect. That would also mean the image would be broken up into about 26 or so 4-GB files.

      But if I understand correctly, instead of using Windows XP, I could just boot into the Macrium Reflect rescue CD (I think the one I used has Windows PE 5) to make an image backup on a “regular” GPT external hdd, is that right? I remember now that in another thread you had talked about booting into the rescue media, but I had forgotten.

      So does this also mean you can boot to the Macrium Reflect rescue media to image Linux even if Windows isn’t installed on the computer?

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by  jburk07. Reason: Added quoted text

    • jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      I hope that is the case. It is true that I won’t really know until I get rid of one of the primary partitions, since that could be the reason that the Mint installer can’t see the internal SSD. All I have to go on right now is the output from the inxi -Fxz terminal command, which indicates that the HP is using RAID mode:
      “Hardware-1: Intel 82801 Mobile SATA Controller [RAID mode] driver: ahci v: 3.0 …”

      Unfortunately, this HP Community forum entry referring to what looks like a similar laptop model (HP Envy TouchSmart m6) isn’t encouraging:

      “The BIOS is defaulted to RAID on your model series because some models come with one of those hybrid drives with a SSD cache and for some technical reason those have to be configured in RAID 0 mode in order for the setup to work right.”

      So I’ll just have to see after I decide which partition(s) to delete.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge

      • This reply was modified 2 weeks ago by  jburk07. Reason: Additional information

    • jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      jburk07 wrote:
      If I continue down this path I’ll get to the point where I’d be running Linux on RAID using mdadm, so I wouldn’t be changing the BIOS, and that arrangement could be less risky to the Windows 7 installation, is that a fair assessment?

      At least if you can see Windows partitions after activating the RAID array, yes.

      So, another question as I’m thinking about being able to recover from changes if needed:
      If I activate the RAID array but then *can’t* see the Windows partitions, would I be able to “deactivate” the RAID array with another terminal command? (This is probably not the right question or terminology, but I’m wondering about being able to undo the change.)
      Or, failing that, would I be able to undo the changes by restoring from an image backup?

      Really wonder if Intel was being sneaky when they were writing the (U)EFI spec… because it’s unreasonably hard to do a proper failure-tolerant mostly-software RAID on UEFI without mdadm and the Intel firmware.

      My disk is MBR and I’m using legacy boot. Even the Linux live USB boots MBR. Does your comment above indicate this method would require UEFI? I just don’t know anything about RAID (and not too much about this stuff in general!) to understand if you were talking about my specific situation or more in general.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge


    • jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks, that makes sense. I haven’t decided yet what I’ll do, but if switching back and then restoring from an image would get me back to where I started, the simplicity is appealing. I haven’t made a new image backup in a few weeks so I’ll need to do that first.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge


    • jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks for the clear explanation and great detail. This is very interesting. I’ll have to read through everything carefully, but if I understand correctly, If I continue down this path I’ll get to the point where I’d be running Linux on RAID using mdadm, so I wouldn’t be changing the BIOS, and that arrangement could be less risky to the Windows 7 installation, is that a fair assessment? Or would activating the RAID array also affect Windows? I realize that things like inserting the mdadm manually might be risky for a Linux newbie, but it seems like I’d only be messing up the Linux installation, is that right?

      Is it likely that running Linux on RAID would affect things down the road, too? For example, would I need to adjust things when I upgrade to the next version?

      I have some other obligations today but I hope to be able to get back to this project later today.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge


    • jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks for the very clear instructions. I have a couple of questions:

      If I already have a Macrium recovery DVD instead of a USB, I imagine I can just use that instead of a USB, right?
      And yes, my images are on external hard drives.
      I do have a Windows repair disk, and there is also a “fix boot problems” utility on the Macrium recovery disk that I could try.
      If I change the BIOS setting to AHCI and then I can’t fix the MBR, would Windows boot again if I just switch it back to the RAID setting? Or is that one of those situations where it *should* work, but things sometimes go wrong?

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge


    • jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      On one of our two Windows 7 x64 laptops, KB4524157 had disappeared from Windows Update when I logged in this morning.

      On the other laptop, the out-of-band rollup was still there, checked, when I first logged in, but Trusted Installer was running so I just let it sit for a few minutes. When I opened Windows Update again, it had disappeared.

      I had already installed the September updates, except for the SSU, on Thursday.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  jburk07.

    • jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      @kp
      When I hid KB4524157, the September patches reappeared in Windows Update, so you could do that instead of downloading them from the catalog.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 1 week ago by  jburk07.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      Pim
    • in reply to: Patch Lady – master patch lists #1944974

      jburk07
      AskWoody Plus

      That link does take me to the html list, and the link from the Master Patch list now works for me, too. I’m on a different machine now than when I wrote the earlier post and don’t currently have access to the others I was using then, so I don’t know if that had anything to do with it; but at any rate it does seem to be working for me now.

      Oh, and yes, I was logged into my Plus account when I wrote the earlier post, too.

      Thanks for all your hard work on these formats, and for all your work in general! Your Master Patch list is indispensable.

      Group A Win7 x64 Home Premium SP1 Ivy Bridge

      • This reply was modified 2 months ago by  jburk07.
      • This reply was modified 2 months ago by  jburk07.
    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 113 total)