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  • Matthew

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    Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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    • in reply to: Win10 usage share surges #1900247

      Matthew
      AskWoody Plus

      The graph and the table seem to be inconsistent.  If one goes to the site and re-creates this graph, then hovers over a July data point in the graph, the following percentages show up:

      Win 10 … 48.86%

      Win 7 … 31.83%

      Win 8.1 … 5.29%

      Mac OS X 10.14 … 5.38%

      So which is correct?  Is it the graph (and the numbers I’ve just shown) or the table?  Confusing at best.  But, realistically, Win 10 is growing and Win 7 is shrinking.

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Third Tuesday patches are out, but not for Win10 1903 #1848621

      Matthew
      AskWoody Plus

      Don’t you mean the third Tuesday in June?

       

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: April 2019 non-Security Office Updates are available #348382

      Matthew
      AskWoody Plus

      In Woody’s ComputerWorld article this April 3 morning he wondered how to find out info on Office releases. Yes, the http://blogs.technet.com/b/office_sustained_engineering web site is gone, but before they took it down, they pointed people to start looking at something like https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/officeupdates/ instead. Unfortunately, that appears to have not yet been updated for yesterday’s releases.

      However, if you go to https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4089498 and you like to use RSS feeds, you can generate a feed for Office 2016 or 2013 or 2010. I did a feed for Office 2013 and got a couple links to yesterday’s updates. So the info is out there. (Well, maybe not all of the info, because I see that PKCano’s list is more extensive than what’s in the RSS feed.)

      As to the idea of having released these updates last month already, my experience in downloading individual updates for Office in the past tells me that this is no new pattern. In other words, it appears that they “publish” these updates a week or two in advance, but don’t really allow you to get your hands on them until the first Tuesday of the month. Or at least that’s what I’ve noticed with the dates in the area shown in Woody’s screenshot.

      1 user thanked author for this post.

    • Matthew
      AskWoody Plus

      Does anyone know if we will be able to “extend” the life of Win 7 via “fudging” the registry to make Windows Update believe we’re running Windows Embedded POSReady 7 instead (like some of us did with Win XP to make WU believe we were running Windows Embedded POSReady 2009 instead)? Obviously those embedded OSs did/do not contain all of the features of their full-fledged counterparts, so there may have been (and may be) security flaws that the embedded OSs did/do not patch, but some patching is better than none for those of us who want to hang on to what we’ve got.


    • Matthew
      AskWoody Plus

      Thanks for your 2nd paragraph reminder. I’m using that for my personal update process. Of course, I’m also in a business environment that is more aggressive than DEFCON or Susan are in pushing out monthly updates, so I just hope and pray that my IT folks are doing enough testing on our environment to avoid any major pitfalls.


    • Matthew
      AskWoody Plus

      Susan, your notes about Office updates talk about 2016 and earlier versions, but my organization is now just pushing out Office 2019. Since I’m sure that 2019 has been out for at least a few months, are there downloadable updates for that version, or how will its updating work? Thanks.

    • in reply to: August 2019 Security patches: It’s a biiiiiiiiig month #1907499

      Matthew
      AskWoody Plus

      From my simplistic understanding, most Windows users are on x64 (64-bit) or x86 (32-bit) architecture.  The IA64 architecture is different, mainly meant for servers, and usually cannot run 32-bit applications (unlike x64 which usually can).  Most of us running a desktop or laptop don’t have IA64.

       

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: August 2019 Security patches: It’s a biiiiiiiiig month #1907312

      Matthew
      AskWoody Plus

      So if we already installed the March version of the SHA-2 update on Windows 7, do we need to install this August version of it?

       

    • in reply to: May 2019 Patch Tuesday arrives #1621748

      Matthew
      AskWoody Plus

      What is the significance of the pciclearstalecache.exe file that it has been given separate downloads? Would we install it first or what? Thanks.

    • in reply to: You know that Windows 7 End-of-Life nag screen? #1170629

      Matthew
      AskWoody Plus

      I also did the XP POS fudging thing — using the registry tweak method — from 2014 to 2017.  Windows Update delivered the appropriate patches for my “XP POS” machine.  I didn’t feel squeamish about it.  Of course, I recognized that I wasn’t having everything in XP patched, but many things were, including IE.  My thought was, “better to have some patching than no patching,” since I knew that I wasn’t going to update the OS on that decade-old PC and I didn’t have a replacement PC ready yet (until 2017).

       

      2 users thanked author for this post.

    • Matthew
      AskWoody Plus

      A similar change in Advanced Options happened to my system (Windows 10 Education 1803 17134.590) within recent days/weeks, where the settings for the number of days that one could put off the two types of updates have disappeared.  Not sure if it’s a February update matter or if it’s some changed configuration that our IT folks pushed out.

       


    • Matthew
      AskWoody Plus

      I’m one of those who does not wish to move to Win-10.  I’d like to see a newsletter article or two (or three) in the coming months on alternate ways to proceed after January 2020, what is involved in following each of those paths, and how secure (or not) each may be.  I guess I see three possible paths, though not all will be available to everyone.

      First is sticking with Win-7 but having some amount of security updates.  Some of us kept Win-XP going beyond EOL by using a trick to get Windows Update to think that our PCs were running Windows Embedded POSReady 2009 (which is still under support until this April!).  That OS only had a subset of Win-XP features, so probably not everything was getting patched.  But it offered more protection than doing nothing.  I want to know if a similar trick will work with Windows Embedded POSReady 7 that can give us Win-7 users more protection (until October 2021) than doing nothing.  Not a great long-term solution, but it may be a solution.

      Second is moving up to Win-8.1 for those of us who bought PCs with a Win-8.1 license but Win-7 preinstalled.  I’ve heard rumors that updating from Win-7 to Win-8 would not involve a full reinstall, but that updating from Win-7 to Win-8.1 does.  Again, it would be nice to know what’s involved and, particularly here, what additional software or tweaks one might need to get it to look and act as closely to Win-7 as possible.  Again, not a super long-term solution (only until January 2023), but it may be a solution for those with a valid Win-8.1 license.

      Third is moving to a different operating system entirely, likely a Linux variety.  Such an article would likely require much more information — or multiple articles — since many of us do not know much at all about Linux, and wonder if software we’re used to having in the Windows world will be available (or have something comparable available) in the Linux world.  Linux is mentioned quite often among viewers of this site, so I’m sure that a lot of folks would be interested in knowing more about it before taking the plunge (and can you still “test drive” it via a Live CD or the 2019 version thereof?).

      Certainly by later this Summer many of us individual consumers are going to have to be thinking more aggressively about the direction we want to go, and for those of us who just do not want to go to Win-10, we’d love some advice from the experts here about some of these other options.

      Thanks, Susan and Woody — and others — for your expertise and your labor of love back on Windows Secrets and here on AskWoody.

       

      5 users thanked author for this post.
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