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  • MHCLV941

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 108 total)
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    • MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      (And I’d hope, end also the present deluge of junk mail, that is one way the Postal Service makes money to finance its operations and obligations.)

      What gives you any hope that anything the USPS does, save raising rates, will stop or even slow down junk mail?   Junk mail is probably the only significant thing that will be left for the USPS if Amazon commanders physical delivery of “everything” because Amazon will most certainly charge more than the USPS does.   For that matter, so what?  Don’t you have a dumpster big enough to hold the junk mail you get?

      I’m more concerned about DeJoy’s plan to change the delivery standard for first-class mail.  If he gets away with doing so, not only with it not be a “temporary” change but in due course even this degraded standard will not be met.

      There is a lot of things in first-class mail that are time-sensitive.  Aside from ballots (mail-in, i.e., absentee, voting has always been legal no matter what party is losing or winning), mail order pharmacy shipments, legal documents (FedEx/UPS isn’t necessarily a legally sufficient way to send documents) and the birthday card you send your mother.

      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      As soon as drone delivery becomes a thing, Amazon will barely need drivers and trucks for last mile (home/business) delivery.

      The drones may cut down on the number of drivers needed but not so much as you seem to think.   Drones can only carry packages under 5 pounds and small enough to fit in the drone’s cargo box.   Aside from technical issues, Amazon intends the make this an extra cost service (so Amazon itself says (See Amazon.com: Prime Air).  If it does so, how many people do you suppose will actually pay for it?  You also assume that local governments will allow the service.

      Drones cannot deliver at all to any area where they cannot safely operate (crowded neighborhoods and/or ones with overhead obstructions) or where Amazon cannot reasonably assure the intended recipient picks up the package (apartment complexes, office buildings, actual urban areas like city centers).   Weather can be problematic as well.  It is not always a nice sunny day with light winds and large open spaces.

      Also, porch pirates are already a problem with drivers ringing the doorbell when they drop off a package and doing their best to put the package where it cannot be seen from the street.    Dropping a package in the front yard, as I’ve seen being done in the demonstrations, is little more than dropping a “steal me” sign.

      Even assuming Amazon can overcome every last technical issue with the drones, there is no guarantee that operations in the real world will actually prove practical.

      • This reply was modified 5 days, 7 hours ago by MHCLV941.
      • This reply was modified 5 days, 7 hours ago by MHCLV941.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      So you have no idea whatsoever why the USPS won’t deliver mail to your house (mailbox) or neighborhood (CBU).    I cannot imagine not pursuing this with the USPS to get an official statement and/or my Congressional representatives to have it changed.

      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      (am I allowed to say the ‘p’ word??)

      No idea because I have no idea what word you have in mind.   Regardless, the USPS would be the only victim, so would FedEx, UPS and other courier services, so I do think the “will” would be there.

      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      The USPS mostly gave up package delivery in the late 80’s bad move.

      Yep, it did and yep, it was a bad move.   However, I don’t think it was as much a deliberate policy decision as it was an inability to do so (up-front funding, administrative and/or legal restrictions, etc.).

      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      It is NOT technical in nature-ie has nothing to do with hardware nor software and it involves a psuedo govermental entity- hence it is now political.

      It is NOT technical in nature-ie has nothing to do with hardware nor software and it involves a psuedo govermental entity- hence it is now political.

      Agree to disagree.

      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      My sister lives in an apartment complex.  She does not have mail delivered to her residence, but that is because “a property with a single mailing address but with multiple mail recipients may utilize a community mail station designated CBU, or Cluster Box Unit. CBUs are typically stand-alone units that have locked individual compartments for each tenant”.

      CBUs are what pass for residential delivery in many parts of the country, and not just for apartment complexes.   I live in a single-family house and my mail is placed in my lockbox in the CBU that just happens to be on the corner of the lot next to mine.  However, the CBU supports 18 houses in total.   We are not in a rural or even formerly rural area;  CBUs have been standard in subdivisions in southern Nevada for about the last 25 years.

      The days of the mail carrier actually coming onto your property to put your mail in your box on your porch or through the mail slot in your door are ending.

      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      The USPS is the only one of the typical carriers that will not deliver to my residence

      Not to challenge your statement but it would be highly informative if you obtained an official statement from the UPSP as to why this is true.

      As I think many believe as I do that the USPS is required to deliver to all addresses in the United States.  Indeed, according to the USPS IG, it does have a “universal service obligation…In general, a USO is a collection of requirements that ensure everyone in the country receives a minimum level of mail service at a reasonable price. The Postal Service’s USO includes a requirement to provide mail services to everyone, regardless of where they live, and for at least one mail product, at a uniform price.”.  (See The Postal Service and Its Obligation | USPS Office of Inspector General (uspsoig.gov)).

      That said there are some correctable conditions that may prevent mail delivery (See No mail delivery? (usps.com)).  Do any of the conditions cited pertain to you?

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      As this institution is a publicly subsidized PRIVATE company, how can their employees be called Federal officers??

      It is not publicly subsidized.  Congress has not appropriated any funds for it since it was converted to its current status in 1970.  Indeed, that was the reason for the conversion. (See How is the U.S. Postal Service governed and funded? (brookings.edu))

      However, the USPS is not a private company in the same way as FedEx or UPS.

      The USPS often is mischaracterized as a quasi governmental or private entity. It is neither. The USPS is a government agency that was created by Congress to achieve various public purposes. Federal law defines what products and services the Postal Service may offer. Additionally, the USPS’s employees are federal employees (emphasis added) who participate in the Civil Service Retirement System, the Federal Employees Retirement System, and the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program.  (See Postal myths: #2 The USPS isn’t part of the federal government | postalnews.com)

      <p style=”text-align: left;”>BTW: Interfering with mail delivery is a federal felony offense.</p>

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      This topic appears to be political and thus contrary to the amended ‘Lounge Rules’.

      Point out the IT angle, and I’ll accept defeat.

      This is not a political issue. The only remote reason one might consider this article “political” is because the USPS found itself embroiled in the November elections.

      It is an infrastructure issue that has the potential to impact all of us, not only in IT, because we get lots of stuff shipped, but because it impacts us as residents of this country.  FedEx, UPS, and the like found their niche by picking off high-profit shipping in ways the USPS could not match.  Whether or not this is a good thing is not the point; Amazon’s potential to impact the shipping industry is.

      5 users thanked author for this post.
      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      The USPS has one advantage that Amazon will, in all probability, never have: sanction by the United States Constitution.

      No doubt Amazon can do what you forecast, at least in more populous areas of the country, and it may well be detrimental to the USPS’ bottom line.  It may also be that the USPS will shrink but it won’t go away and it may be that it has to revert to being a funded part of the federal government instead of its current quasi-corporate status.

      As for your analysis of the potential for running afoul of the Sherman Antitrust Act, it seems to me that it would be very difficult to achieve the homogeny that you foresee without doing so.

      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      Is Amazon willing to become the letter carrier of last resort

      Not likely in the least because there is no way to make money in large areas of the US.  Too few people, too many miles.   FedEx and UPS both add surcharges for rural addresses (not to mention surcharges for delivery to residential addresses).

      There are also legal issues involved.  Only the USPS can place mail in mail boxes.

      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      The reason the USPS is “a subsidized private company that has largely to pay its own way, cover the pension payments of its retired employees, etc.” is precisely because Congress did not want to fund it and in fact, Congress does not fund it at all today.  (See How is the U.S. Postal Service governed and funded? (brookings.edu)) and has not done so since 1970.

       

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Outlook 365 email view in browser opens IE11 #2342740
      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      The solution is to associate .mhtml and ..mhtm file types with Chrome/Firefox…

      Posts in a user form do not make it so.   As many users replied in both forums, the ONLY browser offered for .mht or .mhtml files is IE.  The other options are Word, Excel and the Microsoft Store, the latter only shows third party apps, none of which are browsers.

      in reply to: How Do I Filter “No Content” Messages? #2340363
      MHCLV941
      AskWoody Plus

      Outlook offers the same capability and I’ve made use it – though doing so is a PITA!.

      I’m hoping that there’s some way to identify messages with text in the message body.  I wouldn’t be surprised but that there’s something in the header that would so indicate, but I’ve no idea what it might be.

    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 108 total)