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  • mn–

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 537 total)
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    • in reply to: Intermittent USB port failures #1841837

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      Have you checked the USB port settings and power plan?

      USB Selective Suspend may cause symptoms somewhat like this, but I’ve never seen a case quite as bad as you seem to be describing…

    • in reply to: Linux Vulnerability by Opening Files in Vim or NeoVim #1841683

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      … this was one of those… well, somewhere on the ‘net there might still be a copy of an old newsgroup posting of mine where I complain about the “vi” command starting Vim instead on Linux…

      Oh well. The equivalent feature in Emacs was disabled some time in the 90s already.

      And fortunately my systems are Debian-derivatives nowadays so inherited the “nomodelines” default, which turns off the vulnerable feature unless enabled by user. Which I haven’t.

    • in reply to: Alternatives to Outlook #1840400

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      Actually… it is incorrect to say that “Office 2019” does not include Outlook – because it *does*.
      And Access too. Same as it was with other recent versions…

      MS Office Home & Student 2019 – the cheapest package – doesn’t include Outlook or Access, or a number of other things. And, the license terms are rather restrictive – do check the license wording carefully before using it to write job applications, do any volunteer nonprofit work, or anything like that. (This will also depend on local laws.)

      MS Office Home & Business 2019 has Outlook, but still no Access. License terms are reasonable though.

      MS Office Professional 2019 has Outlook, Access and Publisher.

      That’s just the one-time purchase variants; subscriptions will get full features earlier (Outlook, Access and Publisher are in 365 Home, Personal, Business, Business Premium and…)

      Now, Thunderbird can do at least most of what you specify anyway. (Sender-based coloring will have to be via custom tags from filters, but is possible.) And actually better than Outlook, given the line about “standard features” … Outlook is very much nonstandard.

      Outlook is the only application with *full* support for the PST format, there are ways to work around this (like the readpst tool which isn’t 100% but usually works). Doing the Outlook->Thunderbird migration on your old system via MAPI and then moving Thunderbird to the new system is the best method, anyway, but, with readpst and Thunderbird’s ImportExportTools add-on, you’re likely to be able to get every message out too if you just have the .pst… See http://kb.mozillazine.org/Import_.pst_files for more on that.

      Thunderbird is also a whole lot cheaper than the IBM Lotus Notes client (which is also nonstandard in various ways). Or “The Bat!” or Mailbird or eM Client, for that matter.

      I’m sure there are other alternatives too, especially as you didn’t specify any nonstandard features like addressbook or calendar…

      Hm, actually, there’s no mention of needing to run on Windows, even… does Apple Mail do per-sender coloring?

      I’d recommend Mutt except it lacks markup support in composing.

    • in reply to: Linux Vulnerability by Opening Files in Vim or NeoVim #1844203

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      Yes, disabled was the *default* state but it could be enabled in per-user settings – and in some circles this was even common. Which would then leave the users who did so, vulnerable, and this clearly was a security bug.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Linux Vulnerability by Opening Files in Vim or NeoVim #1843110

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      is there a way to disable the troublesome customizing feature in Vim that, according to the same article, is set on by default? I do not use it.

      Yes.

      Besides this, the researcher has also recommended users to:

      disable modelines feature,

      … this was already the default state in Debian and derivatives, including Ubuntu.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Strange Develoopment in Task Scheduler #1842178

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      I mean, what exact version (build number – find with “winver.exe” or a number of other tools), and did you just install fresh updates?

      Because, well… https://portal.msrc.microsoft.com/en-US/security-guidance/advisory/CVE-2019-1069 … apparently a Task Scheduler vulnerability fix was in Tuesday’s batch, so we’re particularly interested right now…

    • in reply to: Alternatives to Outlook #1842074

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      Yeah, that’s the part where you’ll need a local lawyer – and the locally enforceable translated text too. “Revenue-generating” … “non-profit” …

    • in reply to: Alternatives to Outlook #1841948

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      … but do mind the license wording, especially paragraph 1.a.(iv) at https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/Useterms/Retail/Office365/Home/Useterms_Retail_Office365_Home_English.htm (or your local language version) and how/whether it’ll apply for you, local laws will differ.

      (Though it seems to be much the same for the Home & Student edition too…)

    • in reply to: Alternatives to Outlook #1841919

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well actually, Thunderbird is exactly the kind of an application where you could negotiate a 10-year support contract… because it’s open source, you can get that from anyone and not just the author / publisher. May need to change names and branding at most.

      On the other hand, Outlook is owned and tightly licensed by Microsoft, can’t get at the source code to fix it, and if Microsoft decides to discontinue it, they can do so.

    • in reply to: Alternatives to Outlook #1841826

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well, there is Office 365 Business. That’s the subscription with just the locally installed applications but no mailbox, SharePoint, etc. You do get OneDrive though. And Access and…

      As to the other questions:

      1. Well, Thunderbird is open source and lots of people rely on it, including government organizations in various countries… yes, for continuity I’d actually trust it better than anything from Microsoft.

      2. Depends on how easily you get frustrated. Not nearly as much of a bother as trying to transfer Outlook’s address autocomplete cache even to a different user profile in the same installation of Outlook, for example.

      3. … Lotus Notes used to really earn its place in the User Interface Hall of Shame, but recent versions have been better.

      4. Can be disabled by central admin in some cases but otherwise I don’t know of any that didn’t have this.

      5. No, some of them rely on external tools for that. Mutt for one…

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Mounted ISOs stop Windows updates? #1841718

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      From the wording I’d think this might have been a .iso image file and not a physical disk?

    • in reply to: Test-driving Intel’s Optane in a new PC #1841654

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      As posted earlier, Linux does not use Optane, due to not having suitable driver software, among other differences from Windows.

      Well… it’d be more accurate to say that Linux doesn’t use the Intel special mode for Optane, so it isn’t good for a dual-boot system.

      In a Linux-only system you can use the block device just fine as a lvmcache, zfs L2ARC, or whatever. Even as your boot disk if you really want to.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Test-driving Intel’s Optane in a new PC #1839955

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      Wow, SSDs in the year 2000? That’s amazing, I had no idea they’d been around that long.

      Heh, actually, they’ve been around longer… it’s just, they weren’t mainstream products. There were two main lines of development, one for ruggedness (no moving parts) and the other for performance.

      2GB capacity. How things have changed since then!

      And rackmount chassis, for that single 2GB unit already. The 1000 was… hm, standard 19″ rack for sure, I think a 3U chassis… been a while.

      This is the type that was built out of DRAM modules, and then additional support parts to make it seem like a disk and not lose data during a power outage.

      I really did hope after the launch hype that the Optane would’ve been usable for that performance niche nowadays.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: How to work and play in Win10’s new Sandbox #1839831

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well. It’s not that it’s completely useless, it’s just that it’s easy to run into the exceptions and loopholes even by accident.

      In some situations it’ll pass activation even if you feed it a code that isn’t eligible for activating in a VM. Like for example one from an OEM sticker that was already active for a preinstalled instance directly on a device.
      So, you can have an activated but unlicensed installation.

      It’ll also sometimes fail to activate especially with downgrade rights even with a valid code.
      So, you can have a fully licensed installation that doesn’t activate.

      There’s a fixed number of VMs that a single non-Datacenter license can be used for. The activation cannot keep track of other VMs, especially ones that are isolated or not running; so, you need to keep track of those yourself to avoid accidental licensing violations.

      And then there’s the fun part about buying licenses that may not be applicable to what you want to run and how… like non-preinstall OEM licenses, and what and when you can use those…

    • in reply to: June 2019 Patch Tuesday is rolling out #1839763

      mn–
      AskWoody Lounger

      Well, this would make sense in a “portable” installation, where you never know what hardware you’ll have on next bootup…

    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 537 total)