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  • OscarCP

    OscarCP

    @oscarcp

    Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 6,025 total)
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    • #2404717

      I promised, earlier in this thread, that before coming to a definite conclusion about how good this show was, having already watched the first three episodes, was going to watch also the fourth and fifth of the Wheel of Time in Amazon Prime, when they came out. Well, now both are out and I have indeed watched them.

      So here are my conclusions:

      (1) This show is pure spectacle, lavishly filmed and complemented with high-end CGI, the best Amazon can buy.

      (2) This show is unremitting, tiring sturm und drang with touches of Grand Guignol disgusting grotesquerie, utterly lacking in humor, characters that are ciphers, a plot that is not only predictable if one has ever watched a show about a magical quest or read one in a book, but has no heart nor, as far as I can tell, really a point to make on anything that matters in life.

      (3) I am done watching it.

      (4) I recommend to those who would like to watch a decent fantasy show with live actors, the BBC One & HBO series (on HBO + here in the USA) “His Dark Materials”, based on Phillip Pullman’s book trilogy of the same title. That is a tale of magic and adventure that has everything “The Wheel of Time” lacks and is worth spending time watching. The three books the show is based on are no waste of time, either. Each season covers the stories in one of the books; the first two seasons are already out and available for streaming, while the third, delayed because of the pandemic, will be released sometime in the coming year.

      And with a plot device of parallel worlds, this show has certain science fiction overtones. So it is not entirely out of place mentioning it in this science fiction thread

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

    • #2404708

      wavy: “I just reload a couple of times and magic. Who knows???

      Yeah, I tried that already: No such luck. Thanks, anyway.

      It looks like is not my browser that does not want to load a Netflix video, it is Netflix that does not want my browser to load it. I am getting more and more convinced that this is Netflix doing.

      Why would you, Netflix, do this to me, so suddenly and without previous warning?

      Well … We should have warned you, if we cared. So we didn’t.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

    • #2404616

      What is a “sonata”?
      Well, it’s been different things at different times:

      https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/guides/zwjnsbk/revision/4

      Excerpts:

      During the Baroque period (roughly 1600–1750) the word ‘sonata’ was used quite loosely meaning a piece to be ‘played’ rather than ‘sung’. ‘Sonata’ was generally applied to small instrumental works. There was no set form or number of movements.

      Glenn Gould & Yehudi Menuhin – Bach, Sonata No. 4 in C minor

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Boii0EA6hWo

      ….

      In the Classical period (roughly 1750-1810) ‘sonata’ came to mean a work in several movements. It was usually three, with the first movement in a special sonata form. Sonatas were a popular and important form, and many were composed for amateur performers to play at home.
      During the Classical period the harpsichord had been largely replaced by the piano. Many piano sonatas were written and many composers wrote sonatas for a solo instrument and piano. Violin, cello and flute sonatas were all popular.

      Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven all wrote piano sonatas, violin sonatas and cello sonatas.

      Mozart Piano Sonata No 16 C major K 545 Barenboim, piano

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1vDxlnJVvW8

      ….

      During the Romantic period (roughly the 19th Century) some well-known composers such as Brahms, Liszt and Chopin contributed important works to the sonata repertoire.

      The ensemble sonata (for solo instrument and piano) retained much of its popularity, violin sonatas and cello sonatas in particular.

      Brahms and Schumann both wrote violin sonatas. Brahms also wrote two clarinet sonatas.

      Brahms – Piano Sonata No.3 in F minor, Op.5 – Claudio Arrau, piano

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3KDAe2GtYmw

      ….

      During the late 19th Century, the piano sonata slowly lost its popularity as composers broke away from the traditional form.

      Although sonatas continue to be composed, sonata form is very rarely used for the first movement.

      The 20th Century French composer Poulenc was fond of the form and wrote sonatas for many instruments including oboe, clarinet and flute.

      Poulenc: Sonata for Violin & Piano, FP 119 — Janine Jansen, violin / Alexander Gavrylyuk, piano

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w3AbYdl0tOI

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

    • #2404606

      These advice is for users of Windows, macOS and Linux.

      Those who are familiar with Linux and other Unix-derivated operating systems, such as macOS/OS X, for example using a Mac or a Linux PC, and also those who are not familiar but have such computers — or have installed a Linux emulation application for Windows 7 and up through 10, for now, such as “Cygwin” (*) — if they follow a few easy instructions, can install a text editor called “vi”, if they don’t have it installed already by default (test this by launching “Terminal” and issuing the line-command “vi” (without quotes) to see if the application opens or not). I you don’t have it installed, get it using “homebrew”, if you have a Mac, and from wherever you get applications if you use Linux, and then open the file with the text in question with vi, then issue the vi command:

      Control+G

      to get the total lines, as well as the number of the line and of the column in the line of text where the cursor happens to be, to appear at the bottom of the screen as in this example, where “to.avoid. etc” is a file in my Mac’s desktop:

      “./Desktop/to.avoid.computer.eye.fatigue.txt” line 2 of 22 –9%– col 10

      Instructions:

      To get there, first open the vi application by simply entering the line command:

      vi your file_name

      (If the name has blanks in it enter the name as “file name”, where your actual file might be called anything but this, of course.)

      then, when the file opens:

      Ctrl+G

      If you are done, then:

      :q

      to quit vi.

      At that point you may end the Terminal session with:

      exit

      And you are all done.

      To find out more  about vi, there is a manual available using the command

      man vi

      The application vi is my favorite for editing .txt (ASCII) files and for creating ASCII files. There is practically no limit as to how large the file can be and it is also very, very fast at opening and editing even the largest files, with millions of lines of text, at least when using a computer that is not decades old.

      And there is also Powershell for Macs and for several Linux distributions, but I have  not used them, so I do not know if they have the capability already explained here by others for counting file lines in Windows PCs.

      (*) About how to get and install with a few examples of some basic use of Cygwin in Windows 10, particularly how to access files created with Cygwin from Windows and vice versa:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hqjrQY5P_BQ

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

    • #2404599

      The main (and most secret) spaceport in the world is now also a tourist attraction and on the way to big renovations:

      https://www.bbc.com/travel/article/20211130-humanitys-unlikely-gateway-to-space

      Excerpt:

      The world’s first and most secretive space base, Baikonur Cosmodrome, sits in the middle of a vast Central Asian desert, 2,600km south-east of Moscow and 1,300km from Kazakhstan’s two main cities, Nur-Sultan and Almaty. It was from this remote part of the western steppe in 1957 that the Soviet Union successfully launched the first artificial satellite – Sputnik 1 – into orbit around Earth. Four years later, in 1961, Yuri Gagarin launched from here to become the first human to fly into space aboard the Vostok 1. And in 1963, Valentina Tereshkova launched from Baikonur as the first woman in space.

      After the retirement of Nasa’s Space Shuttle programme in 2011, Baikonur became the planet’s only working launch site to the International Space Station (ISS). Now, 60 years after Gagarin’s historic first flight, it remains the world’s main spaceport.

      But how and why did a dusty outpost in the wilds of western Kazakhstan become humanity’s unlikely gateway to outer space?

      Read on and find out.

      It is the story of one’s of humanities greatest, and most contradictory, achievements: One that took place in the middle of the Cold War and started the human adventure into the Cosmos, after knowledge, profit, and because of why not? making us free from the immemorial bonds of our planet’s gravity well. But also started a new phase of a potentially lethal arms race between the Great Powers of our times. And one that is still very much on, as the very recent Russian destruction of one of their old and already dead satellites when testing a direct ascent antisatellite weapon — a successful test that resulted in the creation of a potentially deadly and ever expanding cloud of hypervelocity fragments that endangers everyone’s further use of outer space — unequivocally bears witness, and implicitly comes along with a dire warning.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2404544

      RamRod wrote: “You can do updates if you like, but don’t put me down for not going along with the mindless, scared masses. No offense – just sayin’…

      No offense? To people you are calling “the mindless, scared masses”?

      But never mind that … Because, yes, there seem to be a lot of sturm und drang going on, more than usual anyway, and is not just about patching. Maybe that’s the reaction of people that are still self-isolating and getting cranky and stressed and depressed … Whatever the reason, some of us have been trying to cheer them up here with music, science fiction, cartoons, stories about aliens zipping around in flying saucers and carving some honking big, if fancy, crop circles in farmer’s valuable ripening corn, even some actual science, but nothing really seems to be working for them right now.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

    • #2404543

      The one real danger is hackers breaking into the NASA servers. This has happened to big organizations, public and private, and had nothing to do with the use of VPN by offsite workers.

      To subvert a secure VPN connection as the one I have described, would be necessary to hack the ISP and from there, somehow, spoof the receiving VPN server to look like it’s me calling — and also to know my login credentials.

      So let us not discuss events that are improbable in practice, even if they are possible in principle. For example, until more than a century ago it was considered as possible, but most improbable, that the Moon was made of green cheese, and this was the reason why this issue was never discussed seriously by astronomers — and something that was finally put to rest when in the late 1960s, the Apollo astronauts brought back pictures and samples of fairly ordinary rocks and found no cheese at all up there.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

    • #2404536

      So it is not the whole Hubble, as a spacecraft, that still is in safe mode, but one of its main instruments and, perhaps, some secondary ones, while further attempts are being made to get everything back to working condition, according to the NASA article linked by  b:

      Hubble’s additional instruments have remained in safe mode while NASA takes steps to recover them to operational status. The rest of the telescope is operating as expected.”

      A gradual recovery of the temporarily lost functions, resulting from what looks like a computer glitch, is to be expected, as such a thing is always done very, very carefully and the time this takes is not the main consideration.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2404535

      Actually, Fred, Alex might be right, but so what? There is no point in arguing against the idea that any given protection against malware, hackers, etc. is not full proof, because that is a truism. But it is also true reasonable measures do make the odds better, and that is the best one can do about anything undesirable. And what NASA, for example, is doing to protect itself against malicious cyberspace actors is, in my opinion, fairly good, even if inevitably imperfect.

      I don’t make a habit of worrying about things that I cannot improve, change, or avoid.

      So, you know what? I believe that there are better things to do than to continue a discussion about bad things that, potentially, perhaps, might happen some day, if someone nasty is also enterprising, clever, competent and lucky enough to make it happen, but who knows if or when?

      Sorry, Alex.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2404505

      Anonymous: Thanks, for the bad news. Here is some more bad news: The James Webb had an accident when it was being strapped to its adapter, the hardware that connects it firmly to the launch rocket and includes the protective fairing meant to prevent it from creating too much air resistance and also from heating and burning thanks to said air resistance when rising through the atmosphere at a speed that eventually becomes much higher than that of sound. What happened is that one of the securing clamps broke, shaking badly this 10 billion piece of hardware that has been under construction for a quarter of a century. So the initial launch was postponed until the telescope had been tested thoroughly looking for possible damage, in order to try to repair any that was found:

      https://arstechnica.com/science/2021/11/an-incident-with-the-james-webb-space-telescope-has-occurred/

      And more about the tricky issue of first launching the James Webb (launch rockets now and then explode or fail to rise properly, so then fall down and crash along with its pricey and priceless payload, … etc.), then sending it far from Earth to the gravitationally stable Lagrange point L2, a million miles behind the Moon (and not loosing it along the way):

      ( https://webb.nasa.gov/content/about/orbit.html )

      So nothing to worry about … until the telescope deploys, that is, unfurls from its packed-for-launch arrangement:

      https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2021/12/james-webb-space-telescope-clamp-nasa/620859/

      Excerpt (emphasis is mine):

      We need to make sure that when we deploy [once the telescope is in its intended position far behind the Moon] , we don’t accidentally snag on any of [the] sensitive components” on the telescope, Krystal Puga, a spacecraft systems engineer at Northrop Grumman, which led the manufacturing of the observatory, said at the same press conference. The sunshield relies on 140 release mechanisms to unfurl, and each “must work perfectly,” Puga said. “They’re all single-point failures.”

      The observatory overall has 344 of these single-point failures, which are as ominous as they sound. About 80 percent of them are involved in the deployment sequence, Menzel said, which is one of the most complex that NASA has ever attempted. “We’ve built it, we’ve aligned it, we’ve tested it, we proved it worked. Now we’re going to have to break it up, fold it up, and actually rebuild it on orbit—rebuild it, realign it, retune it and get it to work robotically on orbit,” Menzel said. “That’s never been done before.” Engineers have, of course, practiced the various deployments over the years, on both small and full-size models.”

      And what is Jenga?

       

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2404501

      Alex: “[…] Once hacked they will use your trusted VPN connection to access servers.

      If something like that were to happen, it would be because NASA IT security procedures are insufficient — and, please, notice that I am NOT stating that they are.

      It will have nothing to do with me personally. In the case of anyone working remotely while using the NASA-approved VPN connection, doing this will pose an equal risk to the government.

      To repeat: noting is invulnerable. But I cannot discuss this in any further detail, because that certainly would violate the security protocols I am expected to follow.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

    • #2404491

      Alex wrote:

      As I understand you are remote working with some government agencies (NASA).. so you are a target for hacking becoming a tunnel to agencies servers..

      I do not use my own home computer for anything related to my work with NASA, but a NASA-loaned one that I only use for NASA business and to send encrypted email only while connected to a NASA Center, to trusted parties, same for receiving emails at that Center (which has to pass some incoming server security filters before reaching me). The email sending and receiving servers are NASA’s and the email client is Outlook, provided by NASA. I only browse Websites with a NASA-approved and provided browser, when this is directly relevant to my work at NASA and, as much as possible, at sites that belong to NASA, or are approved by NASA. I use this computer from home with a point-to-point VPN connection (using an application provided by NASA) directly from the NASA-loaner computer at home (or from wherever else, following the usual safety protocols) to the NASA entry server. The computer is scanned in real time with a government-approved AV. I only participate in teleconferences while connected as already explained to a NASA Center network using an application provided by NASA.

      I do take several annual courses, each with a final exam, about IT security, the handling of sensitive data, etc.

      I believe all of the above is the case when people work remotely or on site (as applicable) for government agencies.

      And no, nothing is absolutely invulnerable to cyber attacks, but I have reason to believe that with the above measures, the chances of my providing a vector for such an attack are acceptably small.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2404470

      I agree with Cybertooth’s comment at the start of this thread entirely. Small-time users like me are unlikely targets.

      The main preoccupation for one of us should be being infected with malware when browsing Websites, so I am all for adding some protective applications, such uBlock Origin, Privacy Badger, an ad blocker, and a few others of this kind, plus a decent antivirus, using a defensive browser setup, observing good browsing hygiene practices — and, preferably, staying well away from Facebook, TikTok, etc. etc. And only opening emails that come from trusted sources or have an obvious legitimate purpose when examined in the review panel — and trashing the rest, while never using URL links in the emails I decide to open without first hovering the cursor over them, etc. I believe that doing all this does make one’s computing safer whether one is using Windows, or Macs, or Linux PCs.

      To me, the one worry is about installing patches and upgrades of the OS. As a rule I wait for them to “mature”, giving them enough time for problems to surface with people complaining about them. Once I have not heard or read anything bad about the update, I would install. If it is a 0-day bug out in the wild, in a matter of days, if it is something else, of a few weeks.

      On the other hand, businesses, including small ones except, perhaps, tiny ones with just one or two persons in the staff, the owner and one or two others (e.g., the son, brother, spouse of owner or close friend), working there — but definitely government organizations and public utilities (water, sewer, electricity, natural gas, etc.), as well as big Cloud depositories of, besides whatever of one is kept in there, one’s personal identifiable information: Those must be seriously protected against ransomware, big data breaches and other things that make for the regular cybercrime scandal of the week.

      I do not recommend using a little known super-safe browser, as such are often not welcome, or work well, in some sites one needs to access. For those sites, using Chrome of FireFox are good bets, as they are accepted pretty much anywhere these days.

      Am I worried about using Chrome? No, I live a busy life and have not much time for worrying, so I prefer to worry about something else, something more interesting and, if possible, more worthwhile. So far, I have not have had, after using Chrome to access some selected sites for several years, any targeted ads, massive spam, been a victim of phishing attempts, etc. to report.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • #2404417

      Good luck using Brave, etc. in sites where such browsers are not welcome. Which are perhaps a lot? #2404396

      Sorry, I intended to post that at the end of this thread, but ended replying, by mistake, to an early comment.  I hope others will read it before they accept uncritically something that is only half the truth.

      I am all for making a busy life free from unnecessary complications and fear.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

    • #2404396

      Brave is not supported in many sites one needs to use. The same is true with other safer browsers mentioned here. Only Chrome and FireFox are more or less guaranteed to be useful at every site of any possible interest to AskWoody’s anonymous visitors and loungers.

      I am not writing this to deprecate Brave and whatever else people here are recommending, but a touch of reality seems to be needed in this thread and, so far, appears to be lacking.

      As to my own experience relevant to this topic:

      For quite a few years I have used Internet Explorer, then adding Waterfox (after some forgettable experiences with FireFox) in order to stream HTML5 content. (I had IE 11 last, on Windows 7, and and HTML5 client was not included in IE until Windows 8.1 came out and the corresponding IE 11 version did include it, but I never upgraded from Win 7 to 8.1.)

      I am using, at present, the last version of Waterfox’s  (“Current”) for most things, except for browsing at those sites where it is not welcome, and those I browse with Chrome.

      I use Intego, an AV recommended by Nathan Parker for my Mac — I used to have Webroot Secure Anywhere for years for my Widows PC and for the Mac, until an update to macOS Big Sur” with the Mac made Webroot flaky. I also scan my SSD with Malwarebytes.

      Never, in more than 22 years using my own computers at home I have been seriously inconvenienced by malware. Or I have been seriously harassed by spammers and con artists or by personally targeted ads. So I am rather skeptical about the repeatedly expressed preoccupation on which browsers are safer, more discreet, etc. I am strict about choosing which emails I bother to open and which I trash, which Websites I visit, and follow common browsing hygiene practices, as well as installing in the Waterfox browser such things as uBlock Origin, Privacy Badger, Tampermonkey and an adblocker (this one both in Waterfox and Chrome). I am not in Facebook, Twitter, etc. etc.

      The main reason for this attitude of mine: I have one life to live and not a lot of time to do it.

      And that is all I can tell you about this topic.

      Ex Windows user (Win. 98, XP, 7) since mid-2020. Now: running macOS Big Sur 11.6 & sometimes, Linux (Mint)

      MacBook Pro circa mid-2015, 15" display, with 16GB 1600 GHz DDR3 RAM, 1 TB SSD, a Haswell architecture Intel CPU with 4 Cores and 8 Threads model i7-4870HQ @ 2.50GHz.
      Intel Iris Pro GPU with Built-in Bus, VRAM 1.5 GB, Display 2880 x 1800 Retina, 24-Bit color.
      Waterfox "Current" and (now and then) Chrome. also Intego AV and Malwarebytes for the Mac.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
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