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  • OscarCP

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 3,280 total)
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    • in reply to: Anybody using 0patch to patch Server 2008 R2 #2211715
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      In case someone here is not aware of this: One needs to have Windows 7 with the S&Q December 19 rollup installed, (or maybe the January 2020 one?), to put one’s version of Windows 7 in the “standardized” form the 0patches can be applied to. It does not matter if one has been Group A or Group B: everyone who wants to get the 0patches has to install that rollup.(The same applied to the Win 7 extended patching service offered by MS, and for the same reason.)

      I never liked rollups; my own approach is written in my signature panel below this comment.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Actually there may not be a need to declare a state of emergency, if what is in the books is already applicable, then just start enforcing that, or else set up new regulations by decree forbidding such activities and making them punishable with fines and imprisonment, but going no further than that. Government lawyers are supposed to be able to figure out all that. And I doubt that hoarders are going to get very far if they used lawyers to defend their case, as companies do when confronted with government’s accusations, at least until they are taken into custody (you have the right to an attorney…) and when attending hearings with magistrates and courts.

      Governors and the president should be able to issue such decrees, applicable in their respective areas of government and for a limited time, until the situation requiring them ends. National and regional legislatures might then set them permanently into law.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Well, today might not be a bad one to add some Mozart music, that makes peopple smarter, and I have chosen two works:

      (1) Mozart’s Symphony 41 in C Major, K 55, called “Jupiter”, with Herbert von Karajan conducting the Berlin Symphonic Orchestra:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2YO7BGQ2h6A

      (2) Mozart’s concert for flute and harp in C Major, K 299, with Neville Marriner conducting the RTSI — the orchestra of the Swiss Italian Radio and Television:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OLFTGanol7w

      Notice that the flute has square wholes and that the harpist, while perhaps not the prettiest one ever, can be heard playing every note with great clarity: this is a very good recording and the best I have found on YouTube, so I decided to bring it here for the enjoyment of  both the eager Mozart’s fan and of the casual passer by.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Agreed: activities like those under consideration here can be forbidden if governments make it so, as they can. I did not actually write that this was a police matter, merely that the police might take a look at what is going on. There might be already legal restrictions to the behavior of people that buy to sell at inflated prices, particularly during national emergencies. Perhaps there might be also relevant old laws and regulations still on the books but not used in a long time, same as the war-time Defense Production Act, one recently invoked by the President (the one that gives the government the power to make certain industries produce items needed in time of war and other national emergencies, such as ventilators, for example, in the present ones.)

      So, police: do have a look, would you?

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • This reply was modified 10 hours, 31 minutes ago by OscarCP.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Hoarding necessities that put vulnerable people at serious risk is not normal buying, it is either irresponsible behavior, in its consequences not much better than looting (even when paying and not just taking), or it is speculation with a view to creating scarcity and being able to resell the items hoarded at a steep prize. That is antisocial and even opportunistic criminal behavior that can be punished with stiff penalties. Under the current emergency situation, it is up to governments to proceed accordingly. This is entirely within their power; whether they choose to exercise it or not by way of emergency decrees and regulations, it is up to them and on them if they choose not. Rationing necessities has been practiced in times of war and during other dire situations requiring serious and quick government action. This is one of such situations. Governments are supposed, first and above all, to do whatever might be necessary to keep their people safe. If they do not choose to do so, then what are they doing there?

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Congress passes 2 Trillion (or 2 long billions) economic stimulus package to ameliorate the consequences of the slow-down of the economy caused by the COVID-19 disruptions:

      https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52070718

      Next: Another usually reliable source publishes the same news that appeared yesterday in “The Guardian” that the USA has now the highest number in the world of diagnosed cases of COVID-19 that have been officially counted:

      https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-52056586

      Please, note that the answer to this new form of the Abbott and Costello’s old “who’s on first” routine, as being reported these days has a pretty volatile answer, the first place some times going to Italy with the USA second and Spain third then, briefly, at other times, the other way around, etc. But these three are steadily the top contenders, in whatever order: Italy, the USA and Spain.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      • This reply was modified 15 hours, 33 minutes ago by OscarCP.
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Doesn’t this also happens when one visits a Web site with visible links to Facebook, Twitter, etc. on the page (“contact us with…” ? I remember reading, some time ago, that to be the case.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: This month's GALILEO shutdown: a warning to our world. #2211308
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Bluetrix, I am not prachtexemplar, but have had this very problem three times, very recently: once yesterday and twice today after making just one or two corrections each time. Until PK explained what might have happened, I was feeling like I had a target painted on my back and someone was out to get me and using me for target practice. Fortunately not.

      But I, and many others, have always been able to make several corrections in a row without any problems within the ten minute’s or so after first posting a comment that are allowed for that. Something is different now, it has been for probably just a few days and, most likely, is also not right. Otherwise, it would be impossible to change one’s mind and modify a comment accordingly, or fix a typo one did not noticed when submitting the comment for the first time (i.e. incorrectly writing a word that is in the dictionary for another such as “to” instead of “two”.) Either one has to accept to leave something “as is”, with typos and, or expressing ideas in ways that do not quite properly reflect what one is trying to say and might lead to unnecessary discussions, or try to fix some of that and then have the posting disappear into server oblivion. Please, dear Woody’s people, find what is going on and fix this problem.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      According to this news article in the “The Guardian”, published today, the USA now is the country with the most diagnosed cases of COVID-19 in the world:

      https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/26/coronavirus-outbreak-us-latest-trump

      Besides providing this alarming news, there is also some considerable, and pointed, criticism of how the USA government has reacted to the pandemic, a criticism mainly directed at its very top, so I have been wondering about where to post this comment. Perhaps in “Rants”? But I decided to post it here, because placing it in “Rants” would have thrown the door way open to a possible political/partisan shouting match unlikely to shade any light but produce much smoke instead, as it usually is the case with such exchanges. And this article, as far as I can tell, is not a political hatchet job, but mainly a presentation of unfortunate facts.

      You shall be the judge.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: “Topic replies” counter inaccurate #2211266
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Comments are also disappearing with great rapidity, after one makes one correction and posts it again. This has happened to me twice today and once to another lounger I was replying to with one of mine. PK restored all three and explained that if one posts a comment and then starts correcting it too soon, the software that manages the forums “thinks” one is making multiple postings fast, marks the comment as “spam” and deletes it, and as I have also found out, keeps on deleting it whenever it shows up again, if someone tries to post it once more.

      This started to happen, that I’ve noticed, two days ago. It did not happen before that, again, at least that I’ve noticed. It looks like something may not be OK, right now, with the software in question.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: COVID-19: The challenges of working from home #2211255
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I have Verizon FIOs and, yes, resolution is very good, but it has worsened some times, presumably because of too many users downloading high-rate data, such as when streaming video. In my personal observation, this has happened very rarely, but always at times when I would expect most people to be on-line watching video. But right now, these are not usual circumstances and the article in the “Fortune”article is just one of several that comes up when googling “covid-19 bandwidth streaming loss” or words to that effect.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: This month's GALILEO shutdown: a warning to our world. #2211252
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I am not a surveyor, but have been doing work closely related to surveying for close to fifty years, been involved with university surveying departments in five different countries and I am a living witness to what I have mentioned in my previous comment. I cannot think offhand of any good article encapsulating this issue, particularly one about plans to overcome the problems I have mentioned, if and when the need arises. I am pretty sure that there are none. So I can only give you, as an answer, three reasons why: (1) common sense (schools and surveying outfits deciding to save on the maintenance of tools no longer needed — under usual circumstances); (2)  “own personal observation”; (3) the lack of real long-term planning and the preference for doing things on the cheap, if that will do; in other words, what is often described also as a very strong preference for doing  “business as usual.” I have participated on discussions, both in line, during live presentations at meetings and in personal exchanges (where everyone is in the same room at the same time), with colleagues, some of them surveyors, and the conclusions have not been encouraging, as I have noted in my previous comments further up. I am a strong opponent of “arguing from authority” (as Aristotle named it and identified as faulty logical reasoning) but in this case is what I have at hand.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: This month's GALILEO shutdown: a warning to our world. #2211244
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      My answer to you comment now has come back! Have a look a bit further up. There is some problem with the server that handles comments. Maybe something is slowing it down?

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: This month's GALILEO shutdown: a warning to our world. #2211237
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Patchexemplar: I appreciate your taking the time to prepare your comment, that is both well-written (in an appealing folksy way) and making some good points there, with which I agree.

      But, as ever, it is not that simple:

      For example, take today’s universal use of GPS (*) in surveying properties to register them in the government’s cadaster, which is the data base with the government records of property boundaries and other relevant information on these. And consider the means by which such property surveys are made.

      These days, properties are surveyed using GPS and many of the people carrying them out are no longer familiar with theodolites, chains, spirit-leveling, electronic distance meters and all the other tools that were in common use until a few decades ago and, therefore, do not depend on the proper working of satellites zipping more than ten thousand miles above our heads. In fact, the use of such tools is no longer taught to would-be surveyors at most universities and technical schools. And the tools themselves, along with the facilities and equipment needed for calibrating them have either been scrapped, or lay unused and not being maintained, stored away against the day when they might be needed, but no one may be able to know anymore what to do with them.

      And when it comes to the Sun burping some nasty stuff, as you have put it, those cadaster records are now days kept in digital form in computers that are liable to get fried if connected to the power grid during one of those massive mass ejections, such as the 1859 one that set telegraph equipment on fire: the white cream topping on the cake.

      (*) GPS and other similar systems, collectively known as GNSS or “Global Navigation Satellite Systems”, term that includes the US GPS, the European GALILEO, the Russian GLONASS and the Chinese Beidou in one big technological tent.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: COVID-19: The challenges of working from home #2211211
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I also have an all-fiber connection (bundled TV, telephone, Internet) that, normally, works perfectly. And have been reading about the possible overloading of the Internet —  and also of WiFi within the home — by all the telecommuting of those now having to work from home and also by all the ones keeping themselves in isolation and streaming video to keep entertained. For example:

      https://fortune.com/2020/03/08/coronavirus-internet-remote-work-from-home/

      One bit of advice I have read about, on the last one, video streaming, is to reduce the resolution of the downloaded picture to lower the overall use of bandwidth, so others can get through effectively for what they need to do by telecommuting. In other words: stiff upper lip and try not to watch more videos in SVA or HD. Or, if one has movies and TV shows on DVD, watch those preferably. Like it or not, a country needs much of the telecommuting work to be done, to keep itself and its economy working for all its people as best as possible.

      One worry I have considered is what may happen now (and this, we all know, happens) when there are prolonged disruptions of Internet services, lasting hours or longer, sometimes.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS + Linux (Mint)

    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 3,280 total)