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  • OscarCP

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 4,323 total)
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    • in reply to: Is this the best science fiction show ever? #2337264
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I just checked and it looks like Netflix’s “3 Below” has not been mentioned here so far. It is the middle series of the (to my taste) terrific animation trilogy “Tales of Arcadia” created by Guillermo del Toro (of whom I am a big fan), that combines magic, slapstick comedy and science fiction, the later being particularly emphasized in this middle series. This series has only a light connection with the rest of the trilogy and can be watched by itself.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/3Below%3A_Tales_of_Arcadia

      This a trailer showing mostly the end part of the first episode :

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4m2hFy3Ggg

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: What Linux is and why it has persisted #2337213
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      And also a small share of a whole lot is still a whole lot. More interesting than their percentage share of the market is what are the Linux running desktops and laptops used for and by whom. How about that a lot of those working in science and in engineering use it to do their research and their R/D work?

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: Do we need Java? #2337209
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      John W: “From a security perspective, there’s no longer a need to be running any more 3rd party code in the browser than we have to.

      I agree. That does not mean that one should get rid of all of them in a hurry. It might be  better to keep some of them installed but disabled, just in case. Right now there is a thread active in AskWoody and dedicated to the serious problems some are having because there are sites they need to access, such as those of certain banks, that regardless of how strongly on disapproves of it, are in fact still requiring the use of Adobe Flash and some of those who got rid of it in a hurry are having serious problems because they did that instead of waiting in case something like this happened. Because we live in a world populated by humans that tend not to get, or if they do get it, to bother to read the memo.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: Apple News Wrap Up: January 23, 2020 #2337206
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      “Garden of American Heroes”, including Jobs statue in it among those of other worthy individuals that have helped to shape the best in this country, the USA, and often far beyond its frontiers, seems like a very good idea. I hope this is not also a reason for a shouting match about who deserves to be in it and who does not. I imagine the same decree has something to say about who will be in charge of this garden, something like an independent and apolitical commission o scholars?; what is the standard for deciding which individuals qualify for consideration to be memorialized, and how to finally choose among them, in the future, who are those yet to be memorialized in it.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: Google threatens to remove search engine from Australia #2337194
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Alex, It is complicated because, at least as I see it, it has the potential for complicating the finding a topic one is searching on the Web, regardless of the search engine used, by one being increasingly unable to look in places with URLs that turned up in the search and where one might go very rarely or just this once in one’s lifetime, and where the information there might not even be about what one is really after.

      I think that the micro payments suggested by Cybertooth could be a solution, if properly implemented, so it is a simple matter of clicking on a button that says: “contribute if you want to have a look at this article by choosing to pay US$0.01, US$0.02,  … ” while showing enough of the article to figure out if it may or may not to have to do with what one is looking for.

      And let me add this: I don’t think that the the issue is just with Google, or whichever search engine we use, making, or not making money by finding for us the URLs of Web pages with articles on something we are looking for, but it is also with us paying for what we use, if we choose to go ahead an use it.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: Adobe Flash Not working for School test #2337176
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      If several of you complained to the Dean and did not get his or her attention, then several of you could pony up and pay a lawyer to write the Dean a letter that might get his or her attention in a hurry.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: Google threatens to remove search engine from Australia #2337150
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      This comment is primarily to answer Fred’s ( #2337083 ) because I am not sure what is the reason behind his comment that, if I understand correctly, all those things and regulations he mentions are likely to be lost or invalidated by Google. If that is not what he meant, apologies for the misunderstanding.

      First I must make three clarifications:

      (1) I’ve never heard of “Google News” until I chanced upon this thread.

      (2) So I decided to investigate and googled “Google News” (I know, I know). This way I went in and had a look. What I discovered is that it is a news aggregator, that collects URLs of Web pages with articles from newspapers and such.

      (3) My comments here, this one included, are intended to provoke an in depth discussion of this important issue.

      From (2) I concluded that there is no difference between reading one of the articles gathered in this way or googling (I know, I know) for news on something or other and getting “hits” that are the URL’s of some news articles in online publications (newspapers, magazines, i.e. “The Verge”). Some of these publications let me read their pages without comment, or at most with an invitation to subscribe. Some rise their paywalls and demand that I first get a paid subscription, and then we’ll see. Some ask me to disable my ad blocker to see their paid ads. Some both ask me to do that and to accept their cookies. Some just let me in without comment. Others let me see the article, but without access via the links in the same page to anything else in their publication. “The New York Times” is an example of this. Others let me see some articles up to a maximum or something like five and then they rise their paywalls.

      And, by the way, this is the case whether I am using “Google News”, or Google, or duckduckgo.

      So, going back to what I said in my previous comment (  #2336813 ): I am afraid that this contention between the government of Oz and Google might result on those who run news sites that allow one to go and read for free an article found when searching the Web will, seeing what is going down there, say to themselves: “What? The Aussies are trying to get Google to pay publications like ours for revealing the URL of of their news articles on topics people are searching for? Well, I don’t know over there, but that kind of thing is unlikely to go very far in our country, so lets act preemptively and get paywalled, or something.”

      And that is why, to repeat, I think this is complicated. But if someone disagrees and is willing to explain to some length why, I’ll be glad to read what they have to say. I am not set at all on an unshakable position on this issue, that to me is a complete, but important novelty.

       

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: Linux is now completely usable on the Mac mini M1 #2337053
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I hope that “running Linux in an M1 Mac on metal” (as mentioned in the article in a subsequent discussion on whether it’s not just as useful to install Linux on an M1 compatible VM) means the executable files are in the ELF binary format that is used in Linux. So if one, for example, compiles a source code and sends the executable to someone that has Linux in the PC, it will run in that machine just as well as it does in one’s own.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Giving you the choice #2337046
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Cybertooth,

      I did not see the blue bar then but I do see it now .

      I think that the reason for the blue bar appearing now, is that I deleted the cookie once more last time, after I closed the browser.

      [Moderator Edit] please stay on topic

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      • This reply was modified 22 hours, 46 minutes ago by OscarCP.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Do we need Java? #2337009
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      I still think that, for now, it is best to keep Java installed but disabled (except, perhaps, for javascript that I believe still has to be kept enabled, at least for now?) Not all Web sites one might need to access, especially some glacially-slow-to-adapt government ones, mainly due to limited resources, are likely to have been modified to make the use of Java unnecessary, as well as changing other things that used to be considered to be OK, but no longer are so.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: Giving you the choice #2337005
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      DriftyDon: ” My subscription is coming due soon and I would like to know if you are going to keep this as a possibility before I re-up.

      My Plus subscription ended today because of a mix-up with my payment that I’m told will be taken care of soon and, as a result, that blue banner is no longer showing up on my browser’s window.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: Google threatens to remove search engine from Australia #2336984
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      Quite. Not my point, though.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: Do we need Java? #2336982
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      JohnW: ” And then there is the other part which is the Java browser plugin, which allows websites to provide interactive Java language applets to the user via the browser.

      Could this be the thing that I was being asked to turn on, without mentioning it specifically, in a pop up with the cup of coffee and the request that I had to have Java installed and running to get things done (I had normally it disabled, so I would turn it on just for that), whenever I connected to a NOAA Website I have used now and then to get some meteorological data, as already mentioned here and now being investigated by Paul_T ( #2336868  )? Of course, that was three years ago and maybe the site has been modified since.

      There was Java, that plugin and javascript as addons in Internet Explorer, and I had normally the first two disabled.

       

      (Please, excuse my present, temporarily de-cockaded status due to a payment mix-up that Susan has promised to take care of.)

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: Do we need Java? #2336872
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      This used be one of those sites. Last time I used this was three years ago and it seems to have changed somewhat. It is a long story to explain how to use it. But even so, maybe you can figure out what is going on with Java there.

      https://www.spc.noaa.gov/exper/soundings/21012300_OBS/

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

      in reply to: Do we need Java? #2336868
      OscarCP
      AskWoody Plus

      A site, in the USA, of an organization that is part of NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) and is called NGS for National Geodetic Survey. They have data from a network of GPS receivers across the USA, among other things, and an interactive map of their network based on Java that one can use to pinpoint a station and get into its Web page by clicking on its pin icon, to download some of the data from there. Also NOAA has a site where, among many other things, one can get on demand so-called T-Skew plots that show together vertical profiles of various meteorological variables above a place and at a time of one’s choosing.  If one does not have Java installed, or else enabled, a notice comes up with the warning that one needs to have Java to continue (the coffee cup logo is shown, to leave no doubts as to what is being meant by “Java”). I imagine there are more sites like that, probably government ones where the budget money for upgrading software and the people available and free enough to do that are not overabundant.

      Windows 7 Professional, SP1, x64 Group W (ex B) & macOS Mojave + Linux (Mint)

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