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  • Nathan Parker

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 970 total)
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    • in reply to: Apple’s WWDC: A retrospective #2276767
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      The new call notifications are going to be really nice, especially when an incoming call comes to my iPad and interrupts my work.

      Nathan Parker

      in reply to: Apple’s WWDC: A retrospective #2276517
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      On my friend needing a new machine, he doesn’t have a ton of money to spend at the moment. He was going to purchase a PC, but the price was close to at least a low-end iMac for the model he was looking at, and he doesn’t want to deal with Windows 10 updates. If he can afford it, I told him he could look at a mid-range iMac so he gets more performance, but he’s a pretty light user. Mainly he uses a web browser and email, but he also wants a desktop form factor. All of his real estate stuff runs in the cloud.

      If it wasn’t for the desktop form factor, he could probably get by with an iPad plus use an Apple Pencil for forms. I guess it could be rigged to an external monitor, keyboard, and mouse.

      True on OEM ARM motherboards.

      Nathan Parker

      in reply to: Apple’s WWDC: A retrospective #2276491
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      On the iPad Air 2, while it won’t receive iPadOS 14, it will receive security updates to iPadOS 13 for a bit, so while you won’t get new features, you’ll still receive security patches.

      True on OpenComputer and Hackintoshes. Going to be much harder once Apple Silicon becomes mainstream.

      I am also impressed with Rosetta 2’s performance on Apple Silicon Macs from the demo. From the demos of Rosetta during the PowerPC to Intel, only light apps ran decently and intense apps ran much more slowly. This time around, with Apple being able to tune the performance of Rosetta 2 to their own chips (plus the PowerPC to Intel Rosetta was basically just licensed software), Apple has been able to make performance shine even on apps running in Rosetta 2. Just think of how well native apps and macOS will run on Apple Silicon. And Apple has certainly been testing and optimizing macOS on Apple Silicon for years. We’re seeing the real benefit of the integration of Apple’s hardware and OS taken to a whole new level.

      I do believe Apple’s SoC GPU’s are as good or possibly better than Intel’s offerings. I’m especially curious as to how this will work in pro offerings (Mac Pro, iMac Pro, iPad Pro, etc) when Apple gets around to transitioning them.

      It is true that Apple will eventually phase out support for Intel Macs (by the time they do, I’ll finally be ready for a new Mac). I wouldn’t drop $$$$ on an Intel Mac at the moment. I am recommending a friend of mine who wants to switch to Mac and needs a new machine now (his old PC is about dead) to go ahead and purchase a low-end iMac. This way he isn’t investing heavily in an Intel Mac, gets a functional machine now, and he can wade out the Apple Silicon transition and later invest in a higher-end iMac down the road when the Apple Silicon transition’s dust settles and he needs a new machine.

      Nathan Parker

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: APFS changes affect Time Machine in macOS Big Sur #2276161
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      It won’t be a full reformat. It can “convert” to the new file system without a full reformat.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: APFS changes affect Time Machine in macOS Big Sur #2276157
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      You won’t lose your files. What will happen is Apple will convert your existing Time Machine backup from being formatted from HFS+ (Apple’s old file system) to APFS (Apple’s new file system). You can choose whether to encrypt it or not in Time Machine preferences (I have mine encrypted for security reasons).

      Overall this is a good move since I’ve had some issues with Time Machine being a little funky backing up an APFS Mac to Time Machine since it still used HFS+. Longterm, this is a good move to ensure Time Machine and the Mac use the same underlying file system.

      In Catalina, Apple already moved the backup database from a .sparsebundle to a .backupbundle and performed the upgrade without any major issues.

      The only possible issue the Time Machine issue would cause is you couldn’t restore your Time Machine backup to an older, non-Catalina Mac, but you likely wouldn’t do that anyway.

      Nathan Parker

      in reply to: Apple’s WWDC: A retrospective #2276156
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      I believe most mainstream developers will follow, and performance on Rosetta 2 for Intel apps that haven’t made the transition to Universal 2 yet looked good in the demo video. The main app I am curious about is CrossOver since I have two critical apps that run on it.

      I wouldn’t invest in a high-end Intel Mac at this time. I have recommended a friend of mine who wants a low-end iMac for his real estate office to go ahead and go for it (he’s a light user) so he’s on a Mac that will hold him over through the transition. By the time it wears out, he can switch to an Apple Silicon Mac without any hiccups.

      My next Mac will likely be Apple Silicon, although it’ll be a while before it happens, and the transition will likely be complete and all the kinks ironed out until I switch (just since I have enough life left on my iMac Pro).

      For those of who aren’t switching anytime soon, it should be business as usual. Our apps will slowly be upgraded to Universal 2 so when we move to Apple Silicon Macs, they’ll run natively, and we’ll get OS updates for a while until Apple finally shuts it off.

      Dark Mode can be disabled. A flip of the switch.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Apple added DoH/DoT to iOS 14, macOS Big Sur #2276155
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Great. I should be set then. Great to know.

      Nathan Parker

      in reply to: Apple AirPods Pro Firmware Update 2D27 Released #2275876
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Thanks. Going to have PKCano update the Apple Update List.

      Nathan Parker

      in reply to: Apple added DoH/DoT to iOS 14, macOS Big Sur #2275875
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      How does this work if I have my entire network set to Cisco OpenDNS?

      Nathan Parker

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      I am drafting up my “WWDC Bottom Line” tonight to send over to Woody to post to the blog. Also hope to watch the WWDC video tonight or tomorrow in case I need to make some last-minute changes to my document.

      I wonder how this will affect apps that run in CrossOver. I have two critical CrossOver apps I use almost daily.

      Not that I’ll be buying an Apple Silicon Mac anytime soon (I have plenty of use left on my current iMac Pro), so they have plenty of time to figure it out.

      Nathan Parker

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      It’s because this isn’t your grandfather’s RISC processor, nor even stock ARM. It will be processors finely-tuned by Apple to offer better performance, battery life on notebooks, etc. With Apple in control of the processor design, long-term we’ll see better performing Macs with greater quality and better hardware/OS integration.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      I will be releasing a full “WWDC Bottom Line” blog post this week once I’ve had a chance to read through all of the WWDC announcements. In the meantime, Apple will release an “Apple Rosetta 2” for ARM Macs. It will allow Intel apps not compiled for ARM chips to run on ARM Macs until those apps go ARM-native (at which then the app would run natively on the ARM Mac). Performance “sounds” better from what I’m reading about the PowerPC to Intel “Rosetta” since Apple has more control over the translation software (the previous “Rosetta” Apple simply licensed).

      From what I read, “Rosetta 2” will even allow some VMs created for Intel Macs under Parallels, etc., to still run on ARM Macs, plus ARM Macs will natively run iOS and iPadOS apps.

      macOS will be supported for Intel Macs for years to come (there’s even some Intel Mac models coming this year), so I won’t rush into an ARM Mac. I am excited about it though and my next Mac purchase will likely be an ARM Mac (although it’ll be a while before I invest in a new machine since I’m set for a while).

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Please help find a good adblocker for Waterfox46.. #2273953
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      There’s also a setting where you can disable acceptable ads as well.

      Nathan Parker

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Alex was writing his at the same time I was writing mine. I added some additional details as to why I’m expecting this transition to overall go smoothly.

      Nathan Parker

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      PowerPC Macs were RISC processors and used a totally different instruction set as well, and yet Apple beautifully transitioned to Intel.

      Apple has basically done three major transitions in the past:

      • Motorola 68K to PowerPC processors
      • Mac OS 9 to Mac OS X (now macOS), which replaced the Mac OS with the UNIX-powered OS based on NeXTSTEP we have today.
      • PowerPC (RISC) processors to Intel/x86 (CISC) processors

      I owned a PowerPC Mac during the Intel transition and moved to Intel a couple of years later. Overall, the transition went smoothly (Apple’s two other previous transitions went smoothly as well from what I heard, although I wasn’t a Mac user during those times).

      What made the PowerPC to Intel transition go smoothly:

      • Apple released a version of XCode that allowed developers to create a “Universal Binary” that could run on both PowerPC and Intel Macs, and upgrading apps to “Universal Binary” apps overall went smoothly.
      • Apple released a translation layer in Mac OS X Tiger and Leopard (and only in Snow Leopard was it an optional install) called “Rosetta” that allowed PowerPC apps to run seamlessly on Intel Macs, albeit at a little slower performance than Intel-native apps (a few apps ran decently this way until the developers released “Universal Binary” apps.
      • Apple released an Intel Mac Developer Kit (basically a Mac Pro shell or at the time called a Power Mac shell with an Intel processor inside) that developers could rent and trade in for a production Intel Mac once shipped that gave them a year ahead to prepare and test their apps for Intel.
      • All versions of Mac OS X from day one were compiled to run on both PowerPC and Intel processors (although we didn’t know about it until Steve Jobs announced it, and only Mac OS X Tiger and later was officially released to run on Intel processors, the others were used internally for testing).

      I expect Apple to follow a similar pattern, plus these are some additional pointers that’ll make the transition more smoothly:

      • Apple has likely been testing an ARM variant of macOS for a while. We know Apple can easily run the core of macOS on ARM since iOS/iPadOS/tvOS/HomePod Software/watchOS/and BridgeOS that powers the T2 chips in Macs are all running on ARM chips and share the same core as macOS.
      • Apple has been paving the way for an ARM macOS for a while: phasing out 32 Bit app support, Project Catalyst apps, transitioning from OpenGL to Metal, all laying the groundwork for making an ARM Mac easier.
      • In terms of “Spectre” and “Meltdown”, while they can affect ARM chips, we also have Apple’s custom chip designs that will be included in any ARM Mac, and Apple can apply plenty of security workarounds to mitigate these issues. These aren’t stock ARM chips.

      While no transition will be without a few hiccups, and with the main issue being running Windows on a Mac will be more difficult unless the ARM variant of Windows seems to run decently on an ARM Mac, and while I won’t run out and buy an ARM Mac, I hope my next Mac is running an ARM chip and I can pivot away from Windows.

      Nathan Parker

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 970 total)