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  • Nathan Parker

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 472 total)
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    • in reply to: OpenDNS vs ISP DNS Question #1875318

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      They may have presumed that you didn’t want the burden of handling that stuff yourself, and acting under the belief that having them administer your network is a service they are providing for you, not that they are exercising authority over you.  I’d hope that they will tell you the login credentials if you asked. As I see it, my LAN is separate and distinct from the internet.  It’s a network of my computers in my house for my benefit, and it would be so even without internet access.  As such, it is beyond the scope (and the reach) of an internet service provider.  Everything outside the house is theirs, but the LAN is inside my house, which is my domain (no pun intended).

      I’ll definitely ask, and good info. They might offer this service included in their plans for those without a lot of network management education, to ensure customers will have their issues resolved no matter what (some customers likely didn’t know the difference between WAN and LAN and kept bugging support for issues they didn’t have the ability to resolve, so now that their routers have cloud-management LAN capabilities, they threw it into the plans). For geeks like us, we’re used to managing our own stuff (I’ve worked with more complex gear than this).

      That is also how I see the LAN as well. It’s “my” network, versus the Internet is the “ISP’s” network. Some of their customers may not know the difference hence the extra service offering, but those of us who have been around tech long enough get it.

      Nathan Parker

    • in reply to: Getting to the Real iCloud Drive Folder on a Mac #1875316

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      what os are you running?  some changes have been happening in the last few versions of the os as well as updates.

      I’m on Mojave. I can get to the Mobile Documents folder in the Finder, but it mirrors what one sees in the iCloud Drive folder in the Finder (it always has).

      There is another “secret” command that an AppleCare Senior Advisor gave me once that can get me into the full contents of the Mobile Documents folder, and I’m kicking myself for forgetting it.

      The Terminal command also gets me there in Terminal, so I could do any work I need to do in Terminal (there’s a few app-related folders I’d like to toss since those apps are no longer supported, and it’d be good to ensure that left over data isn’t stored in iCloud eating up any storage space).

      Nathan Parker

    • in reply to: OpenDNS vs ISP DNS Question #1875007

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      By the way, I did also hear from Cisco OpenDNS on some of my questions. Here’s their answers:

      1. OpenDNS Prosumer is $20/year, so same billing as OpenDNS Home VIP.
      2. Prosumer only protects Macs and PC’s, so since I use all desktops at the moment (except for my super-old PowerBook G4 for hobbyist stuff), no sense in the extra cost for Prosumer. I’d either stick with free or Home VIP if I wanted those perks.
      3. Cisco accounts and OpenDNS accounts are under separate ID’s.
      4. Standard DNS is best way to go since Family Shield has pre-configured settings which can’t be changed.

      Nathan Parker

    • in reply to: OpenDNS vs ISP DNS Question #1875006

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Thanks everyone for the comments. Here’s some additional info…

      1. Indeed it is a thing. They installed the new equipment, but didn’t give me an admin password to check on anything since network cloud management is included in my ISP plan, and they told me to call/email in when I needed changes made, and they’d handle them all (which on one hand has the potential to be luxurious, but sometimes my email tickets go unanswered for a length of time which is problematic).
      2. My current setup is a point-to-point WISP (it’s the only somewhat reliable connection, even though lately the congestion has brought my connection to its knees, even though I live in the middle of a city, our infrastructure here is the worst I’ve seen in broadband. Instead of a modem I have a Cambium Networks antenna on the roof which hits a tower to provide the connection. Then I have a Cambium Networks router in my office which handles DHCP and the router. I have my own Cisco switch for extra ethernet ports. For Wi-Fi, there isn’t a router on the market that if installed in my office on one end of my home will cover my entire home (I tried ASUS AC1900, Cisco WAP, even mesh networking with the Linksys Velop so I could extend the range, still it was unreliable). So my ISP installed a Cambium Networks WAP in my ceiling that they also cloud-manage included in my plan.
      3. Any other router I’d install would introduce issues, as my ISP’s router also handles my phone’s VOIP ATA, plus I need a clean NAT for my work to access my weather station and HD weather camera remotely (since we have TV stations remote into them). Plus any Wi-Fi router isn’t going to give me the coverage of the WAP in my ceiling.

      So my solutions would likely be as follows:

      1. If I decide I’d want to take back control of DNS, I could ask my ISP to flip to OpenDNS and see if they’ll do it.
      2. I could ask my ISP to give me an admin password to my router and WAP so I can make management changes myself, then only bring them in for larger tasks.
      3. If 1-2 fails, I’d either then manually switch my devices to OpenDNS at the device level or just keep running with their DNS servers and still rely on them for any network management until situations change where I’d be in a position to take back over my own network management again (my router needed a firmware update recently, and my ISP forgot to apply the firmware update to the router, so my confidence in their management skills is starting to decrease).

      Nathan Parker

    • in reply to: OpenDNS vs ISP DNS Question #1874734

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Thanks! I’m actually on a Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the other devices I’ve mentioned. I know how to change it on a Mac, iPhone, and iPad, but not sure about Apple TV, Fire TV, NAS devices, etc. I’m also curious if it’d actually benefit me to do this.

      Nathan Parker

    • in reply to: IBM and Red Hat #1874247

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Don’t forget CentOS.

      Nathan Parker

    • in reply to: Roundup of Mac News #1874225

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      I’ll get some hardware bits and pieces, chips and pentalobe screws, on the working table, entirely for free, that I can keep as spares in case the ones back in the machine need replacing.

      Except for the stuff that Apple has soldered to the logic board. 🙂

      Nathan Parker


    • Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      In terms of the major tech companies, I trust Apple more than some of the others in terms of privacy. This doesn’t mean that I would take a carefree attitude with my privacy even with what I have stored with Apple (I don’t store anything with Apple or any other cloud service that I wouldn’t want available publicly because anything can happen). Additionally, Apple’s business model (premium products and now branching into premium services) gives Apple less of an incentive to do things with our privacy in general that competitors who push cheaper hardware and “free” services do with monetizing data.

      More to the topic, even Apple’s telemetry for those who decide to keep it enabled has a level of privacy (known as “differential privacy”), so even with Apple collects telemetry and usage data from customers, their goal is to offer as much privacy as possible with the data. While at times this has led to fewer “innovations” (such as Siri lagging behind Alexa and Google Assistant with fewer telemetry data and the data Apple does collect with higher privacy levels), Apple’s privacy focus across-the-board has turned into a solid advantage for the company.

      Nathan Parker


    • Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      It can be opted out of on Windows too, if you leave (or do not join to begin with) the Consumer Experience Improvement Program (CEIP).

      In terms of general usage statistics, correct. I think what Windows users take issue with are all of the privacy settings in Windows 10. Technically there’s likely a way to opt-out of all of it, but it is complicated.

      Nathan Parker


    • Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      If anyone has any specific questions on privacy settings and opt-out, please let me know, as I’ve dug into this in detail.

      Nathan Parker

    • in reply to: Roundup of Mac News #1874161

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      The 2015 MacBook Pros are somewhat easier to repair that other MacBook Pro models. The Pentalobe screwdriver can be purchased from iFixit (I purchased one once when Apple failed to screw my MacBook Pro back together solidly enough during a repair). The entire back comes off, exposing the logic board and components. The unibody design is mainly for the top shell on the keyboard (instead of multiple layers of aluminum, Apple etches the top shell out of a single brick of aluminum, which they’ve done since 2008).

      The battery itself would be somewhat easy for a repair shop to replace. It’d be difficult to do DIY since it’s built-in, but a repair shop could handle it.

      Even if you keep the machine plugged in 99% of the time, it’s a good idea to occasionally run it on battery to “calibrate” the battery and extend the life (I used to take one weekend per month, run it a few hours on battery, then recharge). Ones I’ve had sitting plugged in 100% of the time, I still wound up with battery issues (swollen batteries, etc.).

      The Surface is the one device that is impossible to easily repair, and I’m thankful I’m done using one.

      Macworld did release a good article today on a MacBook buyer’s guide for the latest models:

      https://www.macworld.com/article/3200690/which-macbook-should-you-buy.html

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Roundup of Mac News #1873807

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      I’ve used Logitech Bluetooth Keyboards, and they are pretty solid. Right now I just own the keyboards that comes with the iMac and iMac Pro, plus the iPad Pro Smart Keyboard.

      That is true on the Keyboard Service Program, and a nice plus that Butterfly Keyboard owners will likely need.

      The 2015 MacBook Pro doesn’t have the Butterfly Keyboard, which is good news. I still had one of those fail once, so you may not be immune to issues, but they were still better than the Butterfly models. I do hope the regular ones make a comeback. I still love my 12″ PowerBook G4 keyboard. Solid as a rock and never failed once. That’s what I really want back.

      Some other news to mention:

      Apple patched the Zoom vulnerability in its own live update, followed by Zoom patching the update itself.

      There’s also a way to get a “free” Nomad Lightning Cable with a $5 tree donation which looks interesting.

      Nathan Parker

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Roundup of Mac News #1873045

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Some Apple authorized service providers may possibly still be able to perform replacements on vintage/obsolete Apple products, although they may have to turn to third-party parts if Apple doesn’t offer the parts, but then at least you would get a place who is fully Apple-trained.

      Even non Apple-authorized places I’ve had good experience with here at least, sometimes they’re even more gentle than Apple’s own service facilities.

      Nathan Parker

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Elago iPod Apple Watch Stand #1875315

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Great! Let me know how it goes!

      Nathan Parker

    • in reply to: OpenDNS vs ISP DNS Question #1874844

      Nathan Parker
      AskWoody_MVP

      Thanks for the info. In terms of changing to OpenDNS at the router level, that’s actually an issue since my router is cloud-managed from my ISP, and they haven’t provided me with the local admin password to make any changes to the configuration. I can certainly ask them about changing it to OpenDNS, but since they’re a fan of their own DNS servers, my request may go down a black hole.

      So the simplest solution would be to change to OpenDNS at each attached device level (as you did for a backup). Have you ever changed any TV streaming boxes, NAS devices, etc., to OpenDNS or just computers, smartphones, and tablets? I know how to do it on a Mac iOS devices, but I also own an Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Drobo NAS, multiple Amazon Echos, a Kindle eReader, a home security system, weather station, network printer, etc., so I wasn’t sure how I’d flip all of those to OpenDNS.

      Sounds good about using the standard DNS servers. Have you used any of the premium services that require a login, or have you just did the DNS flip (the DNS flip is all I’ve done in the past)?

      I too have always used OpenDNS until my ISP took over management of my router (I used it in Georgia when I had DSL and used it here with my current ISP when I managed my own network with Cisco gear), and it was always reliable. I haven’t had any major issues with my ISP’s DNS either, but I have had a few congestion issues with my ISP in general lately, so I wonder if at least taking back control over DNS would give me increased reliability in the event they’re slacking on some infrastructure upgrades. It won’t improve my congestion issue (that’s something they’ll have to do on my connection), but at least they wouldn’t have 100% control over everything (on one hand it has been nice not having to worry about managing my network, but on the other hand, I was generally more on top of network management than they have been overall).

      Nathan Parker

    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 472 total)