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  • Seattle27

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 31 total)
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    • in reply to: Win10 network unable to connect computers #2260691
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      I’ve had the same problem previously. I started with what CADesertRat mentioned as method 1, i.e., made all the services automatic, password protection off, etc, to no avail. Then I ran across something that said turn on password protection and that seemed to help, but it still wasn’t a complete success.

      Anyway, I seem to have stumbled across something. At a time when both computers were recognized in the network, I put one of the publicly shared folders from PC #1 into the start menu of both computers (as an icon in the start menu). I randomly used the Public Videos folder. At a later time, let’s say PC #2 isn’t showing PC #1. I can put a file in the publicly shared folder on PC #1, then I go open the folder from PC #2, and it seems to force a network refresh and voila, PC #2 can see PC #1. (Then the visibility can be lost again, but the folder method hasn’t failed me yet.)

      in reply to: Is this the best science fiction show ever? #2184161
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      I recently stumbled upon the website pluto.tv , which has a ‘Classic Doctor Who’ channel (370), which shows nothing but that 24/7. (It’s free, and there a few repetitive advertisements, but not tons of ads.) Apparently they have about 200 episodes. It seems to be mostly Tom Baker episodes, Pertwee next most often, along with a few of the 1st doctor, some Peter Davison, and a couple Colin Baker & Sylvester McCoy episodes.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Copying files to a new Win 10 computer #2014685
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      I bought a USB transfer cable from a company called Plugable a few years ago to move files between computers. I was getting a bit fed up with using flash drives to do so. This item has served me well; the transfer rate is speedy and it has a drag-and-drop feature (which I use to selectively transfer files) as well as a ‘transfer and synch everything’ option (which I’ve never used). I don’t recall it being $40 as is its current price, but I thought I’d mention it as an option.

      https://www.amazon.com/Plugable-Transfer-Compatible-Computer-Migration/dp/B01B6X8QP0?s=electronics

       

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      in reply to: Is this the best science fiction show ever? #2014253
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      Doctor Who ?

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WwHcV0-uzGc

      • This reply was modified 7 months ago by Seattle27.
      2 users thanked author for this post.
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      I agree that it can be difficult. I help some friends who aren’t tech savvy when they have Windows questions or problems. On paper, saying click ‘Offline Account, then Limited Experience’ makes it sound easy and we’ll be done in 30 seconds. Not so fast, as the friend asks, “What’s an offline account?” Thing is, sometimes the non-techie wants to learn, and doesn’t want to just click buttons as told. So the two clicks might turn into an hour of explaining. Or, perhaps, an infamous Windows message might appear: “Something happened”, and we get to start all over.

      Anyway, sometimes it seems like the 5-minute things turn into entire morning things …

      in reply to: Ordering groceries ahead of time #1985040
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      I’m a wheelchair user and have had my groceries delivered for about a decade now. The national grocery store chain I use charges about $5 for the service with a 4-hour delivery window. (Shorter windows are available for a bit more money.) This is pretty much ideal seeing as how 1) there are no grocery stores nearby in this downtown area, and 2) there’s no way I could carry more than 1 bag of groceries whilst wheeling.

      I sometimes think that I happened to be disabled at just the right time, what with the internet for communication and purchasing of goods and services. I still get out for small convenience store runs and other short trips, so it’s not complete internet dependence here ~ but it sure helps.

      4 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: New Windows 10 PC & Chromebook #1974759
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      Thumb drives and external hard disk drives work fine on Chromebooks. I don’t keep much in local storage on mine.

      Here’s a short guide to some things on Chrome OS :
      https://www.pcworld.com/article/3168062/how-to-use-a-chromebook-10-must-know-tips-tricks-and-tools-for-beginners.html

      It’s nowhere near as complex as Windows, so the learning curve shouldn’t be too steep.

      in reply to: Chromebook expiration dates #1915582
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      I have two Chromebooks that are approaching their end-of-updates (an Acer C910 and an HP 14). A while back, I felt like experimenting and had seen the possibility of side-by-side installation of linux and chrome OS. It did take me several tries to find a linux version I liked, which turned out to be Lubuntu with LXDE desktop environment. It’s fairly lightweight and is acceptably visually appealing to me. Most chromebook processors can’t handle the full eye-candy versions of Linux (Unity or gnome desktop), while the ultralight versions of linux are really plain-looking. I attached a screenshot of my LXDE desktop. I could go into steps, but perhaps it would be best to start a new thread in the Chromebook section for that.

      Getting more on topic, I have found a couple ideas for using Chromebooks after end of updates:

      ~ Use Guest Mode or a separate gmail account. Don’t store any passwords or do any online banking or shopping with this new separate account. (You can’t store anything when in Guest Mode anyway.)

      ~ Mine already have a linux version installed, so I can just start up, acknowledge that I am in developer mode (Ctrl-D), enter guest mode, open a terminal and start up Linux. The linux install ‘sees’ the wifi internet connection, and everything else that I want works (audio, HDMI out, etc). I have Firefox installed as the browser in those. I’ve been using them for months now without any problem; even did full OS version changes on them. (Ubuntu 16.04 to 18.04).

      There’s probably a way for a hacker to get into them, but there would be nothing of value there. I think it’s pretty secure though ~ I’m in a guest mode, then using an encrypted linux sign-in to reach a long-term OS and Firefox, both of which get security updates.

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      in reply to: Patch Lady – 11 days and counting #317926
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      I decided to try to ‘upgrade’ my old Windows 7 (Home Premium) laptop to Windows 10 last week. Even though it warned me twice about a monitor incompatibility, the change to Win10 went through fine with no monitor issues. It did give me 1809 Home, which I decided to convert to Pro. This was on a circa 2011 Acer laptop with only 2 GB of RAM and a single core(!) AMD processor. Memory seems a little tight with Chrome running, but it does fit and actually works pretty fast. It’s just a backup computer, so I’m happy with it. I didn’t have any issues with 1809 as I was going through the laundry list of turning off all the stuff that Microsoft loves to turn on by default …

      in reply to: Patch Lady – Windows 7 documentation is showing it’s age #312566
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      I haven’t had any trouble using 500+ GB external hard drives (Adata and Western Digital) with my Chromebook. I’ve also used a couple different brands of large external monitors connected via HDMI. It’s been simply ‘plug and play’ for those peripherals.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Patch Tuesday patches are here #302928
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      As one data point, I decided to install it a couple of days ago and it didn’t cause any problems (Dell E6430 laptop, Win10 Pro).

      in reply to: Win 10 vs chrome os #241706
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      Yes, you can use a USB wired keyboard and mouse. When I’m at a desk, I almost always plug in a mouse, and I plug in a keyboard as well if I’m going to be typing anything more than an email. Many Chromebooks have 3 USB ports, so chances are you would still have an open USB port for flash drive or external hard drive use.

      An option to eliminate cords running across your desk when using a USB keyboard and mouse is to get a wireless set. I have such a Logitech keyboard and mouse set that was $25. (I use it for my Windows laptop but I have used it on my Chromebook as well.) It only uses 1 USB port, but, if you haven’t seen one before, the little transceiver that goes into the port is better described as tiny. It takes some dexterity to get it in the port, but once it’s in there, you can just leave it in. (image below)

      —-

      Chrome OS does have a setting to change what the buttons on the mouse do.

      (I tested it to be sure).

      Settings -> Device -> Mouse and touchpad

      under Mouse, switch on ‘Swap the primary mouse button’

      —-

      I might as well mention printing in case that’s one of your needs or uses. Chrome OS is pretty well set up to handle wireless printers using something called ‘Google Cloud Print’. However, printers that attach to machines via USB cables won’t work (in general) because there’s no way to install the printer driver software. Google seems to have the newer wireless printer drivers built into the OS.

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      in reply to: Win 10 vs chrome os #241385
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      I’ve been using Chromebooks for a couple of years now. I can’t answer all of your questions, but here’s what I know:

      1) With Chrome OS, you can download pictures and some other types of files. For example, I think I have downloaded a file that had sheet music.

      Chrome OS is essentially the Chrome browser with a rudimentary file system tacked on, plus a native media player.

      You can’t install software applications like Macrium Reflect or whatever else. (You might be able to download their install files, but you won’t be able to install the program.) The only things that you can add to your system are Chrome browser extensions from the Chrome Web Store and apps from Google Play Store (if your Chromebook supports the latter).

      Things are looking up a little bit in that regard as Google is working towards supporting Linux apps on Chrome OS. Only a few models have that currently though (newer, more expensive Chromebooks). If that makes its way into the mainstream, you would be able to run the Firefox browser if you like, for example, or use the VLC media player instead of the native media player (which is just a bare bones player).

      Chromebooks generally only have a small amount of local storage space, like 16 GB or 32 GB flash memory or solid state drive. That’s not a lot of room to store things. They seem to want people to store things in ‘the cloud’ such as in their Google Drive space. (I bought a 500 GB external hard drive for around $60 to take the lack of local storage ‘problem’ out of the picture.)

      2) Chrome OS doesn’t have a ‘desktop’ like Windows. The screen is just an image (you can choose the background image). You can’t place any icons or shortcuts on it.

      I see you have several shortcuts to websites on your desktop. When Chrome OS starts, it opens to the Chrome browser, so if you have those sites bookmarked, you could access them that way. The Chrome browser Bookmarks Bar is handy. It’s a horizontal strip below the browser URL address box. You can put your favorite site bookmarks in that horizontal strip for easy access (as opposed to having to open the ‘Other Bookmarks’ folder at the right and look for them). If you change the name of the bookmark to something short, e.g. ‘Woody’ instead of ‘askwoody.com’, you can fit more icons in the Bookmarks Bar. (see attached image)

      You can set DuckDuckGo or StartPage (or any other page) as your startup page when the Chrome browser opens.

      3) The Adobe Acrobat questions are the ones I don’t really know about. Well, I just found something that makes sense, but bad news. No, Acrobat only works with Windows and Mac. (It’s a software package that you install on those systems; not possible to install on a Chromebook.) My guess is that Chrome OS would be able to convert Acrobat files to a format it can read and write to, or it might suggest an extension or app.

      5) As for the folders below your computer screen image, Chrome OS has a similar type of layout. It has

      a rather basic file system that originally looks something like:

      Recent (files)

      My Files

      – Downloads

      Google Drive

      You can create your own folders in the file system, so, if you wanted, you could duplicate the layout as in your photo, i.e.,

      My Files

      – Documents

      – Downloads

      – Music

      etc

      Chrome OS is a painless operating system as far as updating goes. Those come through about every six weeks . They download in the background and a notification appears when they are ready. One click and it usually takes only a minute or two to install the update.

      But, can you live without those few Windows programs you use?

      I have music software applications (which means they can’t be installed on Chromebooks), so I’m still tied to Windows. I happened to be disabled myself and also had a Windows 7 machine. I decided to try Windows 10 by buying a refurbished Dell laptop, with Win 10 Pro and a 3rd generation i7 chip. Got it through Best Buy (refurbished by a company called Joy Systems) for $250, which is comparable to what I paid for my Chromebook.

      I haven’t had any issues with Windows 10 (versions 1703 to 1803), but then again, I read AskWoody to stay informed about the shenanigans o’ the day from Microsoft.

       

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      in reply to: Windows Media Player #225588
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      Regarding removing an unwanted ‘Open with…”, I had this blog post bookmarked from ghacks.net :

      https://www.ghacks.net/2018/05/24/how-to-remove-open-with-programs-in-windows/

      I don’t have any ideas about the mp3 / media player situation though.

      in reply to: Sticky Notes v 3 rolling out to Win10 1803 customers #219642
      Seattle27
      AskWoody Plus

      Here’s a story. In my case, version 1803 (Pro) no longer displayed thumbnails for mpg files and was also rebuilding the thumbnail cache each time I opened a folder with such files in it. I searched around and found that many users were experiencing this, with suggestions to reset the thumbnail cache, run disk cleanup, make registry entries, etc as solutions. None of those worked. MS apparently removed the codecs for some video files types. Turns out that to get the thumbnails back, you have to install an mpeg2 codec thing from, you guessed it, the Store. Maybe it’s just me, but was it really necessary to remove the codec for a commonly used video file format and put in the store as a separate install?

      1 user thanked author for this post.
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