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  • TonyC

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 73 total)
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    • TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      Hello Carl

      That is a very useful link. Better than any YouTube video clips on the subject!

      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      I know that OOBE stands for “out-of-the-box-experience”, and I know conceptually what an out-of-the-box-experience is. But I don’t know what the relevance of OOBE is when installing Windows 10.

      Is OOBE a part of the Windows 10 installation procedure? I have watched some video clips on YouTube on how to install Windows 10, but none have mentioned OOBE as far as I can recall.

      I am planning to install Windows 10 Pro on a completely empty PC by booting from a USB flash drive containing the Windows 10 Pro installation code. Is OOBE relevant in this scenario?

      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      Because if you are connected, you will be forced to create and use a Microsoft ID. If you are disconnected, the local ID creation is hidden, but available to create.

      Hmm! Have there been any changes in this respect in recent feature levels of Windows 10 Pro? I have seen at least one video clip on YouTube showing the installation of Windows 10 Pro and, in that clip, there was a definite option at one point to continue the installation by creating a local administrator account and not use a Microsoft live account.

      Yes, when installing Windows 7, there were a number of other tasks that I used to perform while disconnected from the Internet but the three that I mentioned were the main ones.

      Is there any document in existence that provides suggested privacy settings for Windows 10?

      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      Thank you for the suggestion. But I already have two USB hard disks which I use for storing system images of my current Windows 7 system and backing up my personal data.

      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      Hello Kathy. Thank you for your input.

      You appear to have a very well-endowed computer for home use. For my modest computing requirements on a home PC, I don’t think I need as much hardware resource as you have.

      The off-the-shelf PC that I have in mind has an Intel i5 9400F 2.9GHz six core processor, 8GB RAM, 240GB SSD (which I shall use as my C: drive), 1TB hard disk (which I shall use as my D: drive to store all my personal data) and an Nvidia GT710 1GB graphics card.

      I suspect that you are right. At the moment, I probably wouldn’t notice much difference, if any, in the response times between having 8GB of RAM and having 16GB of RAM. Other replies in this thread seem to imply this as well.

      The cost of the extra 8GB of RAM is not an issue. But it would irk me to pay for the additional RAM only to discover subsequently that it wasn’t needed.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      … try to insist on dual channel at the native default speed for the ‘board if you can.

      I’m not sure what this means, but I can ask my PC supplier.

      I was also going to ask whether there is any difference between a configuration of 1 x 16GB and a configuration of 2 x 8GB? Is “dual channel”, by any chance, a reference to the latter configuration?

      • This reply was modified 1 month ago by TonyC.
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      Many thanks for the lengthy reply although, as a Computer Science graduate and a former IT professional, I was aware of most of the technical details that you wrote about. But my background is almost exclusively software, which is why I felt the need to ask whether 8GB of RAM is going to be amply sufficient for my needs or whether I should go for 16GB.

      Yes, the PC I have in mind does have an SSD. Whether it is a “quality” one or not, I don’t know (referring to the comment of @satrow). But my session uptimes are not normally very extensive.

      I’m minded to go for 16GB now. I live in the UK and it will cost me about GBP30 (about USD40) extra, which is not an issue.

      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      I have some comments concerning the document AKB2000016. I don’t currently have a Windows 10 system. I am a Windows 7 user who is now in the process of buying a new PC and trying to decide whether to install Windows 10 Home or Windows 10 Pro on it. Hence my interest in this document.

      1. There are statements on the Internet that the metered connection setting works only for a Wifi connection – it does not work for an Ethernet connection. If this is correct, I think this should be stated in the document. And where would this leave Windows 10 Home users trying to manage updates over an Ethernet connection?

      2. I have seen a Windows 10 Home system (at the 1903 feature level) on display in a local store and, in the Advanced Options section, it also had the ability to set an ending calendar date for pausing updates. It therefore appears that Windows 10 Home and Windows 10 Pro have identical function in the Windows Update GUI for pausing updates. If this is correct, I think this should be stated in the document.

      3. The document suggests specific settings for managing updates to Windows 10 Pro, but it would be useful if it did the same for Windows 10 Home.

      4. The problem I am facing in trying to choose between Windows 10 Home and Windows 10 Pro is that I am trying to build a picture in my mind how I might manage updates with each version. The document lists 4 types of update: Feature, Quality, Optional and Other.

      One issue is how do I find out, for each type of update, what updates are available for download and installation? As a Windows 7 user (and a former user of many of its predecessors), I would be tempted to click “Check for Updates”, but the document explicitly warns you not to do this. I can only assume that they just suddenly appear in the Windows Update GUI.

      Another issue is, once I know, for each type of update, what is available, how do I either hide the update or install it? I am guessing that wushowhide, the “Download” button, and the “Download and install now” instruction have a role to play in this.

      In summary, for my purpose, the document would have been better if it had contained a suggested procedure for managing the updates to each of Windows 10 Home and Windows 10 Pro rather than just suggested settings.

      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      My understanding is that there won’t be any new client updates but that definition updates continue – as like you I’ve just installed new definition updates and my computer is showing as protected.

      I can’t remember when the MSE client on my system was last updated anyway. So, no MSE client updates, but MSE definition updates continuing, is just business as usual as far as I am concerned. So I am not sure why Woody was recommending a “move to a different antivirus”, at least in the short term.

      • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by TonyC.
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      @anonymous, thank you. Certainly something to think about.

      Actually, I am not building my own PC. I am buying one from my favourite hardware supplier who can supply a PC with or without an operating system installed. For a number of reasons, I prefer to install the operating system myself. (For example, I prefer the operating system and all application code to occupy the C: partition and my personal data to occupy a D: partition. I don’t store any personal data in the C: partition, and I’ve never seen any “off the shelf” PC system come with a C: partition and a D: partition.)

      I suspect that you are right – that many users will not do a clean install for years. I’ve not done one since 2013 when I installed Windows 7 on my current PC. But, prior to that, during my working life (I’m retired now), I’ve installed Windows NT, Windows 2000 and Windows XP, so I’m not apprehensive about installing Windows 10.

      • This reply was modified 2 months, 2 weeks ago by TonyC.
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      I’ve followed the links and read Woody’s article in Computerworld dated the 25 November 2019 on how to control Windows 10 feature upgrades. Please forgive me if this question has been answered elsewhere – just point me in the right direction.

      I am currently planning to install Windows 10 on a new PC. If I am starting from a completely empty PC, how do I ensure that the feature level and monthly update level of my Windows 10 system are those that are currently recommended (i.e. feature level 1903 and monthly update level December 2019, I believe).

      FYI, I have not yet chosen my Windows 10 edition, but I am leaning towards Pro rather than Home.

      in reply to: MS-DEFCON 5: Get your systems patched #2068886
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      Having read all the discussions on the issue in this thread and others, I decided to install the December SSU (KB4531786) first, and then the December SO update for W7 (KB4530692) and the December CU for IE11 (KB4530677). Absolutely no problems encountered.

      Reasons? I took the view that, because the strong recommendation to install the December SSU is in the PREREQUISITE section of the KB article for the SO update (and also for the Rollup), Microsoft intended that the December SSU be installed BEFORE the subject of the KB article – that is, BEFORE the SO update. And I was also persuaded by the argument that, logically, what is the point of installing the SSU to support the installation of the SO update if you have already installed the SO update?

      My view is that the installation of the SO update (and the Rollup) should encounter no problems provided you have installed the stated DEFINITE prerequisites – that is, the March 2019 SSU and the September 2019 SHA-2 update. Installing the December 2019 SSU is only a strong recommendation, but is not absolutely necessary.

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Where we stand with the December 2019 updates #2054332
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      W7 Home Premium SP1 x64, Group B.

      So, regarding the M$ recommendation to install SSU (2019-12) AFTER the CU,  I noticed the same behavior for November CU/SSU  if you let WU handle the updates automatically.   I don’t know if this behavior was seen in October or earlier.  Does anybody know exactly when this change to “SSU after CU” started in which patch month?

      I have read the KB articles for both the December 2019 Rollup (KB4530734) and the December 2019 SO update (KB4530692) for W7. My interpretation and understanding is that is that Microsoft “strongly recommends” that you install the latest SSU (KB4531786) after you have installed the March 2019 SSU (KB4490628) and the September 2019 SHA-2 update (KB4474419) and restarted your computer – NOT after you have installed either the W7 Rollup or the W7 SO update. All this is written in the “Prerequisite” section of each article.

      That said, I installed the March 2019 SSU on the 5 April 2019 and the September 2019 SHA-2 update on the 4 October 2019. So the prerequisites for the December 2019 W7 SO update have already been installed on my computer for over three months. (I should add that the September 2019 SSU (KB4516655) and the November 2019 SSU (KB4523206) are also installed on my system.) Could someone please let me know (or point me to where it is explained) what potential disaster awaits my system if I follow Microsoft’s recommendation and install the latest SSU (KB4531786) BEFORE installing the December 2019 SO update for W7?

      Or would I really be advised to ignore Microsoft’s strong recommendation, and do what PKCano appears to have done, and install the December 2019 SO update for W7 and the December 2019 CU for IE11 FIRST and afterwards, when I progress onto the WU updates, install the latest SSU (KB4531786) when it is offered?

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Worth considering: 0patch for Win7 after January 2020 #2020680
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      Thank you for the reply.

      You can download and install Bitdefender Free, then either uninstall MSE or just turn it off.

      Conventional advice is that you might encounter problems if you have two anti-virus products running simultaneously. Are you suggesting that you are unlikely to encounter such problems during the short time that BitDefender Free and MSE are running simultaneously? And, by “turn MSE off”, do you mean turn off the real-time protection?

      If you are looking at YouTube videos, you already have the answer.

      Not really. Just because YouTube videos demonstrate download and installation as a continuous procedure does not imply that is the only way of installing BitDefender Free. So I needed an explanation like the one you gave.

      in reply to: Worth considering: 0patch for Win7 after January 2020 #2019786
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      There are a lot of free AVs out there. I use BitDefender Free, but there are many more. How long they support Win7 after EOL is anybody’s guess, but I would think until 2023 because there will be paid Enterprise Win7 around until then.

      I am currently using MSE with Windows 7. If MSE virus definitions become unavailable after Windows 7 EOS, I might need to use the free edition of BitDefender for a month or two until I get a new PC up and running with Windows 10 and Office. I have some questions:

      1. Does BitDefender require any significant management effort? One of the great benefits of MSE from my point of view is that you install it and then, apart from the occasional need to run a quick scan, you can almost forget about it. Is BitDefender like that? I don’t want a geeky anti-virus product.
      2. I presume that I would be advised to uninstall MSE before attempting to install BitDefender. Is the function in Programs and Features sufficient to uninstall MSE cleanly? Or is some special clean-up tool or procedure required? And what about the Windows Firewall?
      3. All the YouTube videos on installing the free edition of BitDefender that I have looked at show download and installation as a continuous procedure. This seems to imply that my PC must be connected to the Internet in order to install BitDefender. But, if I have previously uninstalled MSE, my PC will then be unprotected. Is it possible to download an installation module of BitDefender while connected to the Internet and install it later while not connected to the Internet? This is the way that I used to install a new version of MSE.

    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 73 total)