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  • TonyC

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    Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 74 total)
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    • in reply to: The most recent Servicing Stack Updates #224708
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      I am going to say this for the final time. KB3177467 v2 is completely safe to install, and should be installed by all Win7 users in order to make sure that all future Windows Updates do properly get displayed as available updates. …

      Yes, but where does KB3172605 figure in all this? In your post, and in PKCano’s replies to my query in this thread, the focus has been solely on KB3177467. Why, two years after it was originally released as an optional update, is it now considered desirable to install KB3172605? I can’t find any MS documentation linking KB3172605 with KB3177467, the monthly rollups, or the monthly SO updates.

      in reply to: The most recent Servicing Stack Updates #224624
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      Yes, I remember reading that. But, as I already had KB3177467 installed, I simply went ahead and installed the 2018-09 SO update, KB4457145. And I didn’t encounter an 0x8000FFFF error.

      I did not interpret what MS wrote as suggesting that I should install version 2 of KB3177467 over my existing version 1.

      in reply to: The most recent Servicing Stack Updates #224620
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      For the first time in Sept, KB3177467 became a prereq for the Rollup.

      Yes but, as I am in Group B, I don’t install the Windows 7 rollups.

      in reply to: The most recent Servicing Stack Updates #224615
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      W7x64, Group B.

      This is extraordinary! Why the sudden focus on SSUs?

      Looking back at my installation notes, I installed KB3177467(v1) when I installed my October 2016 updates on the 2 November 2016. I was offered KB3172605 by WU when I installed my July 2016 updates on the 4 August 2016, and I was offered it again when I installed my August and September 2016 updates on the 6 October 2016. As it was designated optional on both occasions, I did not install it and it is now hidden.

      With that SSU environment, I have installed all my updates right up to and including the September 2018 updates without a problem. So, what I have I missed? Or what might I miss in the future if I simply maintain that SSU environment without doing anything?

      Just to confirm, is it now the received wisdom that I should download KB3177467(v2) from the Update Catalog and install it? And then download KB3172605 from the Update Catalog and install that?

      And I’m intrigued to know why, when these updates were originally offered in the order KB3172605 (July 2016) and KB3177467 (October 2016), it is now considered necessary to install them in the reverse order?

      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      OK, it’s now MS-DEFCON 4.

      Given that the July 2018 security only update for Windows 7 was considered unsafe to install, how do I now go about installing both the July 2018 and August 2018 security only updates safely? Surely, as soon as I install the July 2018 update and reboot, my system will, by all accounts, be in an unsafe state.

      I presume that I should forget about KB4338823 completely because KB4345459 is a complete replacement for it?

      And I presume that I need only install the Aug 2018 security only update for IE, KB4343205, because IE security only updates are cumulative?

      in reply to: Tests of KB4099950 #190731
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      @ch100

      Thank you for the explanation of PCI cards, but I am not sure how far that gets me.

      I still suspect that the pci.sys on my system is not used and, as a result, a SlotPersistentInfo registry key has NEVER existed on my system. I’ve looked at the properties of the pci.sys (6.1.7601.24056) that was installed by KB4088878 (the March 2018 security only update) and it was last accessed on the 8 April 2018, which was the very day that I installed KB4088878. So it doesn’t seem that it has been used since then. Moreover, I’ve look at the properties of the previous version of pci.sys (6.1.7601.17514) and it was last accessed on the 21 November 2010, which was the day that I installed Windows 7 on my PC.

      All that said, I’ve now successful installed the April 2018 patches and all is well. Time to move on.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: How to convert from Group B to Group A? #190592
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      @ch100 and @PKCano

      Thank you for your contributions to this thread. You have given me a lot to think about and digest. However, with Patch Tuesday fast approaching, I had to update my system today. And because I didn’t feel prepared to move to Group A, I did it à la Group B.

      During May, I intend to plan my move to Group A with the input you have provided, but I might require some clarification. Hopefully, when the time comes to install the May patches, I will be ready to do it à la Group A.

      I particularly like the idea of deleting and rebuilding the SoftwareDistribution folder. It appeals to my sense of tidiness and order!

      in reply to: Turning the ratchet up to MS-DEFCON 2 #190590
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      Yes, that is my understanding as well. Initially, I was surprised that MS-DEFCON had been reset to 2 so early because I had planned to patch my Windows 7 x64 system today. Anyway, I have just done it and I encountered only the April patches (rollup, preview, MSRT) in Windows Update. So you should still be OK.

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: How to convert from Group B to Group A? #190215
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger


      I would start by hiding the latest Rollup, search for updates, hide the next latest Rollup, search…until you hide the Oct 2106 Rollup. Then install any older patches that have shown up in WU. After a reboot, search for updates and install the Rollup that appears in WU. That is essentially MrBrians method.

      Group A has “Give me recommended updates the same way I get important updates” checked. If you decide to do this. I would recommend you start by unhiding all but the telemetry patches, then searching for updates. Unhiding does not install the updates, but replaces them in the update queue. Some of the ones you have hidden in the past may have been superseded and will not show up. That is the reason for sequentially hiding the Rollups mentioned above – it allows the “missed” patches to reappear.

      Three comments and queries:

      1. On my Windows 7 system, I have to search for updates first before I can see hidden updates. If I click “Restore hidden updates” before I have searched for updates, I get the following message “You have not hidden any updates for your computer”. I don’t know whether this is normal but it might have something to do with the fact that I perpetually have “Never check for updates” set.

      2. If I have hidden all the rollups from the present one back to that of October 2016, surely, after a reboot, a search for updates in WU is not going to reveal a rollup. They were all hidden. Were you not intending that I should unhide the latest rollup after the reboot?

      3. I don’t see the point of hiding all the rollups from the latest back to that of October 2016. OK, older patches that are superseded by a rollup will show up as you progress backwards, but what is the point of making them appear and installing them when they are going to be overwritten later by installing a rollup? As a rollup is cumulative, why not simply install the latest rollup (which supercedes all the “missed” patches) along with the hidden patches that are currently in the hidden list and that you want to install?

      4. dgreen’s post in this thread contains a link to another of your posts. I will inspect that post as well.

      5. Did I not read somewhere that it is Microsoft’s intention that the monthly rollups would gradually bring a Windows 7 system completely up-to-date? So, if I didn’t install any of my hidden updates, over time, each of them would become redundant or superseded. My system has survived so far without the hidden updates, some of which date back to 2016. I suppose my system could therefore survive a year or so longer without them.

      in reply to: How to convert from Group B to Group A? #190132
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      @ch100

      Thank you. There is some good advice in there. I shall probably stick with the MS-DEFCON system. Even before the advent of MS-DEFCON, I always had “Never check for updates” selected, and I would always wait until about three weeks after Patch Tuesday before installing patches manually using Windows Update.

      in reply to: How to convert from Group B to Group A? #190128
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      Thanks Woody. Yes, it’s more the relentless updates and bugs, and I’ve seen you recommend Chromebooks elsewhere. During my working life and in retirement, I have installed and maintained every client Windows system from Windows 98 through to Windows 7 (with the exception of Vista). With my advancing years, I get the feeling that it is better the devil you know!

      in reply to: How to convert from Group B to Group A? #190126
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      @dgreen

      Thank you for the link to PKCano’s post. I was not aware of it. I will compare what PKCano wrote in that post with what PKCano stated in reply to me. However, having looked at the post briefly, I don’t think I wish to go such extremes in order to avoid telemetry.

      I didn’t roll back to December 2017. May be that was a mistake, but rolling back is such a thankless task.

      Yes, over the past few months, I’ve also been coming to AskWoody frequently – too frequently! My objective now is to avoid having to do that in the future. AskWoody is an excellent site, but I just need to get on with other aspects of my life.

      in reply to: How to convert from Group B to Group A? #190117
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      @ch100
      Thank you.

      I am sure those are words of wisdom. However, having been a technical expert in the IT industry for most of my working life (not as a Windows expert, I hasten to add!), as a retiree now, I am looking for a much easier, far less technical life. I have a number of other interests. I need my PC primarily for Office applications and Internet browsing, and I just want to find the easiest and least time consuming way of maintaining Windows 7. I think I’m sold on converting to Group A. Thank you for the link to the My Digital Life forums but I don’t think that I want to get involved in those.

      in reply to: How to convert from Group B to Group A? #190087
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      @Microfix
      Thank you.

      However, as a member of Group B, I have never found it time consuming downloading the Windows 7 security only update and the IE11 cumulative update from the Catalog each month. In a “normal” month, that is all I need to download. I just get the remaining patches (.NET cumulative updates, MSRT, etc.) from Windows Update. That is the normal Group B procedure.

      It’s not that which takes the time. During the past few months, I have spent an extraordinary amount of extra time reading and contributing to threads on AskWoody about which patches to install, which patches not to install, when to install patches, whether to roll back patches, which order to install patches, whether to reboot or not reboot between patches, and so on. And matters have been made worse by the “experts” changing their minds at times (no criticism implied, I hasten to add!).

      I know that Microsoft is not blameless in this context; in fact, Microsoft might arguably be the major contributing factor to the patching chaos of the last few months (poor quality patches, pulling patches, re-releasing patches, poorly documented patches, and so on).

      It is with all this in mind that I wonder whether those in Group A have had it a lot easier than those in Group B?

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      in reply to: Tests of KB4099950 #189961
      TonyC
      AskWoody Lounger

      @ch100
      First and foremost, I would like to thank you for your patience in replying to me. You have been very kind.

      First thing is that I hope you are actually only trying to understand this issue better for learning/researching purpose …

      Not really. I am still a little uneasy about whether my system is in a fit state to apply the April updates.

      … someone … explained … that the SlotPersistentInfo is deleted temporarily until the pci.sys version is upgraded. The new pci.sys version does not take the registry key in consideration. This is the reason why the machine must not be rebooted between the installation of KB4099950 and the other patch upgrading pci.sys. …

      This still doesn’t make sense to me. If the new version of pci.sys takes no notice of the SlotPersistentInfo key, why must the key be deleted before KB4088875/KB4088878 installs the new version?

      … Going back to your situation, you told me elsewhere on this forum that you have a wired card, …

      This is where we might get to the nub of my problem. I am a technical person. I have two degrees in Computer Science, one of which is a Ph.D.. And, before retiring, I worked for 37 years in the IT industry, mainly as a software specialist/consultant. With the exception of Vista, I have installed and maintained every client Windows system from Windows 98 through to Windows 7. All that said, my knowledge of computer hardware is very rudimentary and, basically, I treat any PC almost as a black box from the point of view of its hardware components and their drivers. So I am afraid that terms like “PCI card”, “PCI Express” and “PCI slot” don’t mean that much to me.

      Yes, in another thread, I stated that my system has an Ethernet network interface card which is wired by Ethernet cable to my hub/router. I don’t have a wireless/Wi-Fi card. If I look in Device Manager, under “Network Adapters”, I see only “Realtek PCIe GBE Family Controller”. If I unhide devices, I see 12 other “network adapters”, but none of them look anything like “PCI Express”. I have opened a command prompt window as an administrator, set DEVMGR_SHOW_NONPERSISTENT_DEVICES to 1, and then started the Device Manager from the same command prompt window. I don’t think I saw any “ghosted” devices but, to be honest, I wasn’t at all sure what I should be looking for.

      If I may paraphrase in my own words, I think what you are telling me is as follows. From what little you know of my PC, you believe that I don’t have a hardware component (e.g. a PCI Express card) that requires/uses pci.sys and, because of that, a SlotPersistentInfo registry key has NEVER existed on my system, which is the sole reason I cannot find it now. So, for my PC, running KB4099950 and the upgrading of pci.sys by KB4088878 were completely irrelevant and redundant actions. Correct?

      A post in another thread mentioned something to the effect that, because I rebooted between installing KB4099950 and installing KB4088878, the metadata used by Windows Update might now be incorrect. Are you able to provide any reassurances about this?

      All that said, my system appears to be working well and I have had no networking problems. On the other hand, I haven’t gone looking for problems in Event Viewer, etc.!

    Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 74 total)