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  • warrenrumak

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 204 total)
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    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Isn’t this a defcon 1 situation at this point, Woody?  Installing the August patches is actively breaking a variety of business-critical applications.


    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Sometime in the past few hours, the KB articles for every August Windows patch has been updated with this “Known issue” After installing this update,
      [See the full post at: Microsoft quietly updates all of this month’s Windows patches warning about conflicts with Visual Basic 6, VBA and VBScript]

      Who still runs year 2000 VB6 ?Microsoft shouldn’t fix this.

      Mainstream Support for Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0 ended on March 31, 2005
      Visual Basic 6.0 extended support ended in March 2008.

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 1 day ago by  Alex5723.

      They shouldn’t break it, either.  There’s no reason to do that.

    • in reply to: August 2019 Security patches: It’s a biiiiiiiiig month #1907559

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      It’s a small thing, but it’s worth mentioning that the availability of .NET Framework 4.8 to versions of Windows prior to 1903 is going to be throttled over the coming weeks and months.  Doing a “Check for Updates” will bypass the throttling, but otherwise it’s not going to show up right away for many people.

      .NET 4.8 is already included with Windows 10 1903 so none of this applies there.

      Details:  https://devblogs.microsoft.com/dotnet/net-framework-4-8-is-available-on-windows-update-wsus-and-mu-catalog/

      BTW, the main reason to install .NET 4.8 is that it improves startup time on a lot of .NET applications, in some cases by more than 20%.

      4 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: Big bunch of bad drivers #1906691

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      I wonder if something like this might not also cause problems when running other operating systems besides Windows (e.g. Linux, macOS… ) or whether this is limited entirely to Windows.

      This is not a problem that is specific to Windows — all the major operating systems support running third-party drivers inside the kernel space.

      The problem is more prevalent on Windows since there are more manufacturers targeting the platform with drivers.  I’m sure if researchers looked hard enough, they’d find a number of vulnerabilities in drivers produced for macOS as well.

      The cool thing about macOS here is that they do have their Gatekeeper functionality, along with some basic anti-malware capabilities, which allows Apple to reach out to every Mac configured to allow it to automatically disable bad drivers.  They did this recently with Zoom video conferencing software.

      Linux is a whole different story, since many more drivers are actually included with the kernel and are therefore both open-source and carefully peer-reviewed before inclusion.  But if there is a bad driver, it still requires that administrators update their Linux systems manually.

       

       

      3 users thanked author for this post.

    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      I suspect part of the problem here is that people are assuming that the RST driver downloads cover all hardware revisions, similar to a graphics card driver.  It doesn’t work like this!

      Specifically, the v15, v16 and v17 Intel RST drivers do not support pre-Skylake systems.

      The Readme for the v15 and v17 drivers do not list any of the chipsets from the 5/6/7/8/9 series.  That includes any chipset with a two-digit number, e.g. “Q57”, “B85”, “Z97”.  It also says on the download page for the v15 chipset after listing the 100 Series & later chipsets, “For Intel® platforms not supported above, visit the RAID version 14.8.0.”  The v14 drivers are indeed the last ones to support the 7/8/9 Series.  Intel is still updating the v14 drivers with occasional fixes.

      The 100 Series chipset (the successor to the 9 series) was introduced in late 2015 to support the sixth-generation Skylake CPUs.  Anyone who has an Intel Core CPU where the first number after the hyphen is less than 6 (e.g. i7-4790), installing the newer drivers will have no effect.

      The exact matrix of which Intel RST drivers should be paired with which systems is a lot more complicated than this. Getting it wrong can result in losing access to drives, including the boot drive. That’s why Microsoft and Intel both recommend getting these drivers from the motherboard manufacturer, not directly from Intel.

      3 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: BlueKeep exploitation expected soon #1882082

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      @gborn has also blogged, on borncity.com:
      BlueKeep warning: Exploit might come soon?

      “It is currently estimated that approximately 800,000 systems are still unpatched and accessible via the Internet”

      I find it hard to believe that there are this many Windows XP / Vista / 7 / 2003 / 2008 / 2008R2 machines with RDP turned on that are fully exposed to the Internet.

      Granted there are plenty of “forgotten” Windows Server installations out there that aren’t getting patched…. but how many of them have a public IP address?


    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      The Brazil thing isn’t about “time zones” per se…. the zones themselves are not changing.  The government has eliminated Daylight Savings Time altogether.


    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      I’m curious to know why Microsoft hasn’t acknowledged the 1903 + NVidia colour banding issue yet.

      There’s a thread on NVidia’s forums about it:

      https://forums.geforce.com/default/topic/1152704/geforce-drivers/visible-stripes-in-gradients-with-windows-10-update-1903-using-any-of-the-430-x-drivers/post/6109417/

      Eizo, the manufacturer of high-end monitors, is advising customers to not upgrade to 1903 because of this issue, too.
      https://www.eizoglobal.com/support/compatibility/software/problem_windows10_may_2019_update/index.html

      Hard to tell at this point how widespread the problem is, but when a hardware manufacturer starts saying “Hey, don’t upgrade”, it’s time for Microsoft to say something.


    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Your personal health is always more important than the health of a computer.  Get some rest, man.

      4 users thanked author for this post.

    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      If your company has Office 365 Business or Business Premium, and they have purchased a license for you, you can install it at home as well as having it on your work computer. In fact you can install it on up to five devices total – your work computer plus four more.

      So while you won’t have your own license, you will have a very generous offering as long as you have your current job.

      If you do that, you lose a significant portion of the benefit of Office 365, which is the ability to keep your documents backed up to OneDrive where they’ll be safe in case your system crashes, and the ability to access those documents while away from the computer.

      Unless you’re fine with putting your personal files on the company OneDrive, of course…..

       

    • in reply to: MS-DEFCON 4: Time to get the July 2019 patches installed #1901190

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      You can hit ‘Update Definitions’ if you like, but you don’t have to.  It’ll take care of itself.  Microsoft produces updates to their antimalware definitions 10+ times a day… substantially faster than most systems will stay up to date.

      Your “1.299.867” definitions are maybe 2 days behind.

      You can check the Windows Event Logs to see when definitions are installed, to get a sense of how often it happens.

       

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: July 2019 Patch Tuesday has arrived #1873688

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Ehhh, you’re exaggerating.  Nearly 100% of the delta between this month’s Windows 7 and Windows 10 patch count is down to a single root issue.

      The reality of what happened here is pretty interesting.  Windows 10 1709 included new support for OpenType Variable Fonts. This new standard allows for setting any arbitrary level of bold-ness, not just “bold” and “normal”.  Like this:

      Untitled-1

      Adobe has an open-source library on GitHub for interpreting this new type of font.  Microsoft decided to incorporate this library into DirectWrite.  Google Project Zero investigated this library and discovered it does almost no error checking at all when loading these fonts from disk.  A rookie mistake — as we’ve come to expect from Adobe, if the number of Flash vulnerabilities over the years has been any indication.

      Anyways, as a result, DirectWrite’s font loading inherited a lot of vulnerabilities caused by maliciously-crafted Adobe OpenType font files.  According to Google, the vulnerability can only be exploited when someone tries to print a file containing a malicious OpenType font file via Edge, or by using “Microsoft Print to PDF”.  Just looking at it in the browser is apparently safe.

      Because exploiting the vulnerability requires printing a document from unproven origin, it’s been rated as a low security threat.

      So, yes, sure, Windows 7 doesn’t have those vulnerabilities…. but that’s ONLY because it is 9 years behind in its font standards support!

      • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  warrenrumak.
      • This reply was modified 1 month, 2 weeks ago by  warrenrumak.
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    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Microsoft is surely going to call it a “feature update”, no matter how big or small it is.  Why? Because they have a sales & support strategy built up around the idea of “two feature updates every year”…. especially the part where the second-half releases get 30 months of support.  This strategy was introduced, what, two years ago, tops?  They’d look pretty foolish to dump it so soon.

      That’s why they can’t just skip 19H2, even if it is just 19H1 with the “H1” scribbled over with red crayon, and “H2” written next to it.  They have to put out something!

      And besides, there will surely be some new things in 19H2…. I’ve heard that a few items may be backported from 20H1 that are already finished, like performance improvements.  Personally I think the Accessibility features should be backported…. no reason to sit on completed work that actually helps folks with special needs.

      We’ll see what happens there.


    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      The patch quality problem is not unique to Windows 10.  Windows 7 got hit by the recent Event Viewer Custom Views and IE SVG rendering bugs, too.


    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      The answer to your question is clearly displayed in the chart I posted.  Windows 10 has more than 50% of all Windows usage now — that’s literally the dictionary definition of “absolute majority”.

      Take a minute with Statcounter or Netmarketshare to explore the numbers for yourself.

      Steam’s hardware survey also has Windows 10 usage among gamers to be above 70%, with Windows 7 at 25% and Windows 8.x at 5%.  Their numbers show that Non-Win10 usage is dropping at a rate of about 1%  month.

       

    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 204 total)