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  • warrenrumak

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    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 256 total)
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    • in reply to: Freeware Spotlight — WPD #2003468

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Back in the day, if Windows 95 had sent out today’s Win10 telemetry, our 56K modem connections would have constantly ground to a standstill.

      This joke falls a bit flat because

      1. 56k modems weren’t introduced until well into 1998 (e.g. US Robotics Sportster x2/V.90)
      2. 56k upload speeds didn’t come around until the v.92 protocol was introduced in 1999, and a lot of internet service providers didn’t fully support it until 2000

      Also, just for reference, the AskWoody home page — which is admirably small in size — would take about 90 seconds to download on a 56k modem.

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.

    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      To be more precise about it, they’re deleting old MSKB articles related to hotfixes that they no longer offer.

      This really isn’t new for Microsoft. They have been deleting old hotfix KB articles for many years.  Try and find a Windows 2000 SP2 hotfix article on Microsoft’s web site…. you won’t find it because that stuff went away in 2010!

      Here’s an example.  One of the articles is titled “An update is available to enable the Albany AMT and Thorndale AMT fonts to be displayed correctly in Internet Explorer 9”  (KB2591500)…. This was a bug with Windows 7 post-SP1, and it only happened if you tried to use these third-party fonts in italics in a WPF application, after IE9 has been installed.  It is NOT a bug with IE9 — the patch is for DirectWrite!

      Here’s a copy of the article on archive.org: http://web.archive.org/web/20140216193745/http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2591500/es

      Chances are really good that they looked at the number of times this article was accessed, and it was precisely “zero” for a very long time.  There’s really nothing of value here.

       

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 1 day ago by  warrenrumak.
      1 user thanked author for this post.
      b

    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      I’ve seen a similar problem with a Dell XPS 15.  It was the cable.

      • This reply was modified 1 week, 2 days ago by  warrenrumak.
    • in reply to: Windows Insider Skip Ahead Ring goes bye-bye #2000864

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Some additional news…. .the person in charge of flighting at Microsoft said at Ignite on Wednesday that she doesn’t like the “fast” and “slow” ring terminology, and that they’re going to be changing this in the next couple of months.

      It’s here in this video at about 15:00:

      https://myignite.techcommunity.microsoft.com/sessions/79638?source=sessions

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: New Chredge logo #1998472

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Going to get a bit crowded down there on the old Task Bar. IE11, Edge (the original and unloved) FireFox 70 and now Chredge.
      Purposefully never took the Beta’s of Chredge for a Test Drive. Think i’ll wait a while before the inevitable Bugs get “Shook out” and with the brand new “loud” Logo might have to wear sunglasses at first logon of the day. 😉

      Microsoft has already stated that Chromium Edge will be replacing the old Edge:
      https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/deployedge/microsoft-edge-sysupdate-windows-updates

      There’s also no need to keep the IE11 icon.  Chromium Edge has an “IE Mode” built in; you can choose which sites should run in IE11.  The only things that aren’t supported are IE toolbars, and IE11’s developer tools.  Details here:
      https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/deployedge/edge-ie-mode

      2 users thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: How to keep Win10 version 1909 from installing #1997173

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Nitpicker’s corner:  All Windows 10 1903 machines already have the entire contents of Windows 10 1909 on them…. it’s just that the feature flags enabling the new features are turned off.

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.

    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Not to put too fine a point on this, Oscar, the answer to your question is in the article that you should’ve read.  I shall quote the salient part here for you: “Business users accessing Chrome through virtual machine environments like Citrix kept seeing white screens on open Chrome tabs

      It has nothing to do with Windows 10.

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
    • in reply to: November 2019 Patch Tuesday arrives #2004466

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      I hope it does fix your problem, but it’s not likely.  The “Keyboard Lockdown Subsystem” is part of an optional feature of Windows 10 Enterprise / Education only, that allows administrators to configure certain keys or combinations of keys to be disabled, such as ALT+F4 or CTRL+ALT+DEL.  Useful for kiosks or screens intended for use by children.  (Before Windows 10, you usually had to use third-party software to do this sort of thing.)

      The fix (which is considered a security fix) actually shipped with every version of Windows 10 older than 1903 last month… not sure why they waited until the November updates to ship it for 1903.

       


    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Those were taken offline at least two years ago. Why are you bringing it up here?


    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      They aren’t deleting “old documentation”.  They’re deleting old knowledge base articles for hotfixes that they no longer offer because they’re rolled into more modern Cumulative Updates for Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2.

      You’d have to be using Windows 7 RTM or SP1 with absolutely no patches applied, whatsoever, for any of the issues described in these knowledge base articles to be applicable to you.  Nobody in their right mind is doing that in 2019.

      Do you really care that Microsoft is no longer offering for download the Compatibility View list that they published in mid-2009?  It’s just a list of web sites that weren’t IE9 compatible at the time. It’s totally irrelevant today.

       

      1 user thanked author for this post.
      b
    • in reply to: Surface Pro X review embargo just lapsed #1999898

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Okay yes, that is definitely something that happens out there.  Especially in the gaming industry.

      But after watching the Verge review of the Surface Pro X (which is -really- well-produced, definitely worth a watch), it’s clear that they aren’t being paid to market the product.  They don’t gloss over some the fairly obvious problems, like the fact that it’s hard to touch the taskbar icons when the keyboard is folded in, or that 64-bit apps and games just don’t work, or that battery life isn’t as good as the name “ARM” evokes, or that Photoshop is really slow, or, or, or……

       

      2 users thanked author for this post.
      Norio, b

    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      There’s no way Microsoft would release a security-only patch that would disable RDP and/or close the firewall port.  No way whatsoever.

    • in reply to: Win7 share declining slowly, Edge still in the doldrums #1997015

      warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      I’d like there to be some XP stats at its EOL compared to 7 just like there is about to be Windows 7’s EOL stats compared to Windows 10

      The rate of decline in usage of Windows 7 over the last three years, is roughly same as it was for Windows XP from early 2011 (release of Windows 7 SP1) to early 2014 (end of XP extended support).

      Windows XP, July 2011: ~50%
      Windows XP, April 2014: ~27%

      Windows 7, September 2016: ~47%
      Windows 7, October 2019: ~27%

      Statcounterhas some slightly different numbers, but the overall trend is the same.  You can look at the graph for the last 10 years here: https://gs.statcounter.com/windows-version-market-share/desktop/worldwide/#monthly-200901-201910


    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      Are you using DNS blacklists by any chance, like, for doing ad blocking?  You might be blocking servers that Windows Update needs to do Feature Updates.

       


    • warrenrumak
      AskWoody Plus

      The low percentage shouldn’t be too surprising.  AdDuplex (and Microsoft’s own occasional proclamations of milestones) counts Windows 10 devices, not people.  A lot of people running Insider Preview builds have other computers.

      For example, I have 5 Windows 10 devices between home and work.  Four of them are 1903, one of them is 20H1.

       

    Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 256 total)