• WSEricFletcher

    WSEricFletcher

    @wsericfletcher

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    • in reply to: Unwanted page numbers on blank pages #1483629

      According to the Chicago Manual of Style, new sections should start on a recto (right, or odd-numbered) page “keeping left-hand page blank”. This self-publishing blog (http://www.self-pub.net/blog/creating-proper-blank-pages-in-a-book-layout/) agrees, and has a good explanation of how to use section breaks to achieve it.

      While some technical manuals do require numbers on all pages, they typically also want any empty pages to include something like “This page intentionally left blank” — presumably to remove any ambiguity about a reproduction problem causing content to be missed.

    • in reply to: Extracting paragraphs #1477176

      If you use Find and Replace to tag any paragraphs containing your codes with a unique style, you could then use Find to extract all instances of the tagged paragraph. For example:

      1. Using the Find and Replace dialog…
      Find what box: (GAMD)
      Replace with box: ^& and use Format to set Style: Quote
      Replace All

      2. Use the Find dialog (not the Find pane) with nothing in the Find what box, but set Format to choose the Quote style. When you click the Find In button, it will highlight (select) all paragraphs set with the Quote style. Drop out of the dialog and use Ctrl-C to copy the selection.

      3. Move your focus to where you want the extracted ¶s and use Ctrl-V to paste them.

      Repeat step #1 for the other codes to be able to pull them all at once in #2 & 3.

      Any paragraph style will work; I’ve just used Quote here as an example. The ^& token in #1 replaces the found code with itself, so it just acts as a holder to set the style for paragraphs containing it.

    • in reply to: Using IF logical formula to determine formatting #1468699

      :clapping: Wow! That is a very slick example of field code logic Macropod; definitely one for my ‘useful tricks’ file…

      I’m so glad I chose accounting instead of programming…

      Despite lots of supposedly clear examples, I’ve never been able to wrap my head around double entry accounting! This thread is a great example of why forums like this are so useful.

    • in reply to: Eliminate Page Number on Cover Page – Word 2010 #1467321

      Learning how to use sections effectively does have a steep learning curve Lou, but the benefits are worth it if you use Word to prepare books. The setup each time is tedious though, so I start with a 19-section boilerplate document that I’ve already set up for each of the possible book structures I may need. I can use the Page Setup dialog to adjust the dimensions and choose “Whole document” in the Apply to setting to have them apply to all sections at once.

      Following are the sections in my boilerplate document (copied from the documentation I maintain within it):

        [*]Half title page: empty header/footers
        [*]Title page: starts odd page; empty header/footers disconnected from previous; pg# continue from previous section
        [*]Copyright page: starts next page; empty header/footers disconnected from previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page contents
        [*]Dedication & epigraph pages: starts odd page; empty header/footers disconnected from previous; pg# continue from previous section
        [*]Table of Contents: starts odd page; header/footers disconnected from previous; pg# format=i, ii, iii…; pg# continue from previous section; 1st pg footer with ctrd page #, even pg header with left page #, odd pg header with right pg#; boilerplate Contents heading + TOC field code with my preferred switch settings
        [*]List of Figures: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading + TOC field code with my preferred switch settings to collect figure titles
        [*]List of Tables: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading + TOC field code with my preferred switch settings to collect table titles
        [*]Foreword: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
        [*]Preface: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
        [*]Acknowledgments: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
        [*]First section of main body: starts odd page; header/footers disconnected from previous; pg# format=1, 2, 3…; pg# start at 1; 1st pg footer with ctrd page #, even pg header with left page #, odd pg header with right pg#
        [*]Second section of main body: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section
        [*]Afterword: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
        [*]Appendix title page: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading + TOC field code with my preferred switch settings
        [*]Notes: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
        [*]Bibliography: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
        [*]Contributors: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading
        [*]Index: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; Index heading and INDEX field code with my preferred switch settings
        [*]Colophon: starts odd page; header/footers connected to previous; pg# continue from previous section; boilerplate page heading

      This setup allows me to delete any sections I don’t need for a particular project. The sections are set up for my preferred style for numbering and having new elements begin on a right-facing page. I typically include field codes to insert the chapter title automatically in even page headers and the book title in odd page headers adjacent to the page number. My typical 1st page header is a fixed space with extra space after to push the chapter start down on the page, and the 1st page footer contains just a centered page number.

      Notes:

        [*]By default, the first section in the front matter will be page i, so if I eliminate the half-title page, the title page will become i. However, the page number will only appear when a header or footer includes it; in my case, at the start of the table of contents.
        [*]Including the two main body sections ensures that the page numbering will continue after the first one. I can start additional chapters by inserting a new odd page section—and it will inherit all of the attributes of the previous section.
        [*]Be sure to use Page Setup’s Layout tab to turn on the “Different odd and even” and Different first page” checkboxes to be able to use all three types of page header/footers for double-sided printing.
        [*]You need to have a minimum of 3 empty pages to define the 1st, odd, and even page header/footers (you can delete the page breaks after defining the header/footers).
        [*]The various style definitions used for my boilerplate headings (Foreword, Preface, chapter starts, etc.) all include a “Style for following paragraph” to ensure that the correct style is used for the 1st ¶ after the included boilerplate wording. (In fact, mine typically uses the Body Text First Indent style—and since its definition uses Body Text as the “Style for following paragraph”, I won’t have to specifically apply styles until I need quite a different style.)
        [*]My boilerplate document includes a bookmark named “IncludeInTOC” spans from the Foreword through to the end of the Colophon section so it can be used with the TOC field code’s b switch to include only pages within the named bookmark’s range.
        [*]My boilerplate Appendices section includes a TOC field code set up to collect page numbers from headings specific to the appendices. This allows me to generate a separate table of contents for the appendices if applicable.
        [*]If you use Word Options > Advanced > Show document content to turn on “Show bookmarks” and set Field shading= Always (to show the content of field codes with a grey highlight), these automation entities will be easier to notice. (The above includes 4 tables of contents + and index field code, as well as additional field codes within the page headers and footers. Having them show as obvious field codes reduces the risk of accidentally deleting them or overlooking the need to alter them.)

      I realize this post is a bit long, but hopefully it can be a useful guideline for how to use Word sections. 🙂

    • in reply to: Eliminate Page Number on Cover Page – Word 2010 #1467174

      This is a common section-related issue. RetiredGeek’s method will work, but as you’ve seen it requires you to edit out what you don’t want.

      This method gives you all the control, and should give you insight into how sections work with header/footers.

      1. Position the cursor at the beginning of your document (i.e. at the start of your page i).

      2. Page Layout > Breaks > Section Breaks, Next page (or odd page if you want the next section to start on a facing page in a 2-sided job). You’ll now have an empty new section 1, and you’ll see it starts with page i. If the starting number of your original page i is now page ii, use the Insert > Page Number > Format Page Numbers… dialog to change the radio button from “Continue from previous section” to “Start at: 1”. (If the page number was already “i”, it means you already did this earlier.)

      3. Double-click within your page header/footer to bring up the Header & Footer Tools. Click the “Link to Previous” button to disconnect this section’s header (or footer) definition from the previous one. The “Same as Previous” indicator will disappear.

      4. Now click the “Previous” button to display the header (or footer) for the new section you inserted. Select it and delete it, then click the red X to close the header/footer.

      You can now create your cover page in the new section 1.

      The key here is to remember that header/footers are connected to the previous section by default and that inserting a new section will inherit the header/footers from the existing section. You already managed the page numbering to go from i, ii, iii… to 1, 2, 3… by using the Format Page Numbers dialog. However, unless you disconnect section 2’s header/footer from that of the new section 1 you inserted, deleting it from the new section will also remove it from what was originally your first section.

      As is often the case with Word, it takes more to explain it than to do it!

    • in reply to: Replace hyphens between numbers with en-dashes #1460036

      Be sure to use the numeric keypad for the digits when you use lfh003’s tip. It doesn’t work if you use the numbers on the normal keyboard.

    • in reply to: Wildcards #1459392

      The ^$ token is not valid when “Use wildcards” is selected. I suspect you used the Special pulldown to choose “Any letter” before you turned on the wildcard checkbox. If you have that option checked first, the context-sensitive Special pulldown will only present the options available for a wildcard search, and you’ll see that “Any letter” is no longer available.

      To use wildcards correctly in your example, you’d need to use [A-z]ix — or, to find just those words beginning with any letter and followed by “ix”, use <[A-z]ix.

      Note that "[A-z]" restricts the expression to upper- and lowercase Western alphabet letters only, so unlike the ^$ token used in a non-wildcard Find, it would not find äix unless you added it specifically (i.e. [A-zä]).

      Word's wildcard capabilities are arguably not as comprehensive as some other tools using regular expressions, but they will work reliably if you follow the rules. A good reference for wildcard usage is this well-explained page from MVP Graham Mayor.

    • in reply to: Replace hyphens between numbers with en-dashes #1459389

      The en dash may be an available option via the Special pulldown in the Find and Replace “More>>” dialog—and if it is, will appear in the replace with box as the ^= token (and ^+ for the longer em dash).

      RetiredGeek’s Ctrl-NumericPadHyphen entry method will work for the en dash (in Windows; Option-Minus on a Mac), but the result can be hard to differentiate from a hyphen in a dialog box. An alternative is to use ^0150 to enter the en dash character (and ^0151 for an em dash).

    • in reply to: Missing several Word functions #1458700

      I’m missing several functions in Word since a month or so, like copy/paste; fonts; size of fonts; change capital letters; auto completion of words, and a number of other functions which I remember only when I need them…which is frequently.

      Just FYI, keyboard shortcuts for each of the functions you cite will work whether or not the toolbar is visible.

        [*]Copy and paste: Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V (cut=Ctrl-X)
        [*]Change font size: select and press Ctrl-Shift-> to increase; Ctrl-Shift-< to decrease
        [*]Alter capitalization: Shift-F3 cycles through initial capital, all caps, and all lowercase for the current word or selection
        [*]Auto complete (for autotext entries): type in the autotext name and press F3 to expand it

      Refer to this Microsoft knowledge base article for a full list of the standard keyboard shortcuts. Note that you can also customize the keyboard to create your own shortcuts for Word features or change existing shortcuts.

    • You can re-attach a template and update the document styles via the Templates and Add-ins dialog. Unfortunately, this dialog is included within the normally-hidden Developer ribbon group, so you’ll need to use File > Options > Customize to enable it (The command is “Document Template”).

      This will bring the document styles up-to-date, but as Andrew noted, would not change things like page layouts or header/footers if they’ve been changed since the template was originally applied.

      Given that you are dealing with a large number of documents, it may be worth creating a macro to help automate it for you. I have found that the most complicated challenge for this type of task is dealing with documents where there are multiple sections with differing page layouts (i.e. portrait and landscape layouts), and header/footers that reference (or not) previous instances. If you expect this would be only an occasional situation, you could just have the macro re-attach the template and post an alert for manual intervention if the document contains >1 section.

    • You can customize the Quick Access Toolbar to add the command “New Blank Document”, but the easyist way would be to use the Ctrl-N keyboard shortcut. (If that has been re-assigned to something else, you can create your own alternative via the Customize Keyboard dialog (File > Options >Customize Ribbon, Keyboard shortcuts Customize button). The FileNewDefault command is what you need.

    • Are you operating with >1 screen? The Styles dialog will normally dock if you drag it towards an edge. If you have a dual screen monitor setup, the dialog can be moved onto the 2nd screen instead of docking. However, when that happens, the dialog will disappear if you move the focus away from Word (by clicking in a window on the other screen for example), so it may look like the dialog box has disappeared. It should re-appear when you return the focus to Word.

      The Alt-Ctrl-Shift-S key sequence should toggle visibility of this dialog. I assume that was the shortcut key you say wasn’t working.

    • in reply to: Helpful macros for Word 2010 and 2013 wanted #1449232

      The best efficiency tool I have found is a simple document template with a fairly narrow set of well structured styles that you can apply with shortcut keys.

      I totally agree! Moreover, if you use a structured approach, semi-automated tools like macros are far more dependable. I’ve always felt that if someone is trying to use Word without taking advantage of styles and templates, they may as well save their $ and just use free alternatives like WordPad instead.

    • in reply to: Duplex printing and Section Breaks (Odd Page) #1446870

      I doubt if a template from an earlier version of Word would cause a problem like this. Can you clarify what is happening a bit more? From what I understand, you have a document being printed duplex. Although you have added a “New Odd Page” section break to force a next page to start on a new odd-numbered recto page, the page continues to be printed on the back side of the previous page.

      Have you checked to ensure that you do not have an extra section break? The status bar will report the page and section number (if it doesn’t, right-click within the status bar and turn them on). Click within the text just before the odd page section break and note the section and page number, then press the right arrow until you see the numbers change. You should see something like “page 1 section 1” and then “page 3 section 2” — but if it reports a skipped section number, examine the content to find a hidden section break.

      Have you actually printed the document to ensure that a blank page is not inserted? The print preview won’t display the empty pages forced by an odd (or even) section break, although they will be included during the actual print.

      Finally, try printing this document on another printer. It may be that the problem is coming from the printer driver, and not within Word.

    • in reply to: Highligted words without vba #1439868

      As noted, you can Find the highlight attribute, but not a particular color of highlight.

      However, if you set up different character styles to apply different colors of shading, you can then Find by the character style name.

    Viewing 15 replies - 1 through 15 (of 122 total)