Woody Leonhard's no-bull news, tips and help for Windows, Office and more… Please disable your ad blocker – our (polite!) ads help keep AskWoody going!
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon
  • Watch out: Win10 Update Facilitation as a Service and a new push for the Update Assistant

    Posted on June 18th, 2018 at 07:33 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Nag me all you want, Microsoft, but this is getting ridiculous. All I want is an “Off” button — until you figure out how to deliver reliable patches and upgrades.

    Computerworld Woody on Windows.

  • More Windows patches — and warnings about the Win10 1709 update KB 4089848

    Posted on March 23rd, 2018 at 08:24 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    In yet another out-of-out-of-band flurry, on Thursday Microsoft released new cumulative updates for all Win10 versions, a couple of Servicing Stack updates, two previews of Monthly rollups… and absolutely nothing that fixes the flaws in this month’s botched Win7 patch.

    And the Windows Update bypassing routine blamed for the forced push from Win10 1703 to 1709? It’s baaaaaaaaaack.

    Computerworld Woody on Windows.

    UPDATE: @PKCano found a patch for Win10 1709 that “This update makes improvements to ease the upgrade experience to Windows 10 Version 1709.”

    Go figger. KB 4094276. It’s listed on the KBNew page, but the link there (which was provided by Microsoft) doesn’t work.

  • Surprise! A new version of the Windows Update block-buster KB 4023057

    Posted on March 23rd, 2018 at 07:42 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    While scanning through the KBNew list, I bumped into an old f(r)iend, KB 4023057. Looks like it was re-issued on March 22 — along with about half a gazillion patches for Windows.

    KB 4023057, if you don’t recall, is the patch that’s credited with busting through sites that have Windows Update blocked. There’s a discussion here, with this description from abbodi86:

    it evolved from just fixing registry to restore tasks and fix drivers DB, and compatibilty for UAC management..

    the main purpose or function did not change: re-allow blocked or disabled WU

    Of course, Microsoft’s official description is the usual “Nothing to see here, folks” drivel:

    This update includes reliability improvements that affect the update service components in Windows 10 Versions 1507, 1511, 1607, and 1703.

    This update includes files and resources that address issues that affect the update processes in Windows 10. These improvements ensure that quality updates are installed seamlessly on your device and help to improve the reliability and security of devices running Windows 10.  When Windows update is available for your device, devices that do not have enough disk…

    Only certain builds of Windows 10 Versions 1507, 1511, 1607, and 1703 require this update. Devices that are running those builds will automatically get the update downloaded and installed through Windows Update.

    This update is also offered directly to Windows Update Client for some devices that have not installed the most recent updates. This update is not offered from the Microsoft Update Catalog.

    I just wish Microsoft could speak plainly. In this case, some Win10 users (not sure which ones) are getting a patch that (apparently?) breaks their wuauserv settings. I assume that its entire reason for existence is to push more people onto the next version of Win10.

    Does anybody out there have any better info?

  • Microsoft releases new version of Win10 patch KB 4023057

    Posted on March 9th, 2018 at 07:17 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Many people are blaming the KB 4023057 patch for all of the forced-upgrade-to-1709 woes.

    Guess what? Microsoft released a new version of the KB article last night.

    KB 4023057 — Update to Windows 10 Versions 1507, 1511, 1607, and 1703 for update reliability: March 8, 2018

    Only certain builds of Windows 10 Versions 1507, 1511, 1607, and 1703 require this update. Devices that are running those builds will automatically get the update downloaded and installed through Windows Update… This update is not offered from the Microsoft Update Catalog.

    Anybody want to bet that Microsoft just went through an “Aw, jeeez” experience and pulled whatever was cramming 1709 down customers’ throats?

    Man, I can’t believe this…..

    P.S. Thanks once again to @MrBrian. I found this by looking through this morning’s KBNew list.

    UPDATE: Günter Born has an explanation for the last version of  KB 4023057, dated Feb. 8.

  • Huge trove of new KBs

    Posted on February 22nd, 2018 at 17:49 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    I just posted a bunch of newly created — and updated — KBs on the KBNew list.

    Will report back on them in the morning.

    See anything interesting?

  • KB 4023057 is back again. Again.

    Posted on February 9th, 2018 at 04:05 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    While sifting through the latest KB article change list, I noticed that our old friend KB 4023057 is back.

    Now titled Update to Windows 10 Versions 1507, 1511, 1607, and 1703 for update reliability: February 8, 2018, the KB number should ring some bells.

    Our own @abbodi86 said this about the last onslaught, in October:

    It’s a tool called “Remediation Shell” which remedies “fixes” update-related components to facilitate the upgrade from one version of Win10 to another.

    Registry settings, services status, USO and Windows Update SIH (Silent Install Helper), scheduled tasks, disk space, launch Windows10UpgraderApp.exe if installed (included with 1607 cumulative update since June)

    I haven’t heard anything new about this latest and greatest version, so I assume that @abbodi86’s description still pertains.

    In short, it’s innocuous. Don’t go out of your way to install it, but don’t fear the reaper, either.

    UPDATE: Günter Born notes that KB 2952664 for Win7 and KB 2976978 for Win8.1 (both unchecked and optional) were also released yesterday. Born’s take on the Win7 and 8.1 versions is different from mine:

    These updates have been good for problems in the past and also had to be withdrawn by Microsoft in some cases. There were machines that hung themselves, where the fan was running at full speed, or where websites or the machine was freezing for short periods of time (see here). Herehere and here are older threads mentions install errors with these updates. Here someone mentions boot issues in November 2017. Weighting all this risks against the benefits of a ‘diagnosis update’, I recommend to hide these updates.

    I’m convinced.

  • Another complaint about KB 4023057

    Posted on January 30th, 2018 at 13:34 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Earlier today I had a tweet from Help4me who’s frustrated that we’re still stuck at MS-DEFCON 2:

    Soon after, I saw this blog post from an old friend, Michael Horowitz:

    Last night, I closed the lid on the laptop and heard it beep to indicate that it was sleeping… Opening the lid did nothing, it was still sleeping (the power button blinks to indicate this). Press the power button again and again and again and again and nothing. With no other option, I press and hold the power button for about 8 seconds or so and the machine finally springs to life… it is installing bug fixes as part of the boot process. .. Windows Update history shows that it installed an update, KB4023057, yesterday.

    Of course, KB 4023057 is an old – downright ancient – patch. @abbodi86 warned about it last October:

    Is a Win10 1607 cumulative update re-enabling a disabled Windows Update service?

    If y’all want to install this month’s patches — primarily to fix a Meltdown/Spectre vulnerability that’s never been seen in the wild — more power to ya. As for me and mine, I’m gonna wait.

    Unless Windows Update jumps up and bites me in the posterior, as it has Horowitz.

  • Looks like sometimes-patch KB 4023057 is back

    Posted on October 13th, 2017 at 20:22 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Microsoft’ KB article doesn’t shed much light, but KB 4023057 Update to Windows 10 Versions 1507, 1511, and 1607 for update reliability: October 12, 2017 has reappeared, according to Günter Born.

    Only certain builds of Windows 10 Versions 1507, 1511, and 1607 require this update. Devices that are running those builds will automatically get the update downloaded and installed through Windows Update.

    This update replaces the previously released update 4022868. (“Update to Windows 10 Version 1507 and Version 1511 for update reliability: May 30, 2017”)

    This isn’t the first time we’ve seen KB 4023057. I’ve seen reports of the same KB (apparently released on June 21) in mid-July, and from our own @AElMassry on July 26. Born reports that it rolled out on October 5. The KB article says it’s at revision 53.