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  • MS-DEFCON 4: A perfect calm before the next patching storm

    Posted on December 7th, 2018 at 11:44 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Well, not literally perfect, but pretty close. Get your patches installed.

    There’s a new Flash update, KB 4471331, that you need (if it appears in your Windows Update list) and a new KB 4023057 that you don’t want.

    Last month’s tactic of setting Win10 Pro “quality update” (cumulative update) deferrals to 15 days seems to be working well. If you followed my advice last month, you already have your patches, and everything should be fine. You don’t need to lift a finger.

    Details in Computerworld. Woody on Windows

    We’re at MS-DEFCON 4: There are isolated problems with current patches, but they are well-known and documented here. Check this site to see if you’re affected and if things look OK, go ahead and patch.

  • Microsoft pushes yet another version of KB 4023057

    Posted on December 7th, 2018 at 10:42 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    In the perennial bad news department:

    Yesterday Microsoft released yet another version of KB 4023057, the Update to Windows 10, versions 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709, and 1803 for update reliability. This is the 20th or 30th version of the patch.

    As I said on Nov 19, the last time it was updated:

    @ch100 has offered the only explanation that makes sense to me:

    KB4023057 was and still is one of the most weird and unexplained updates in the recent times. This update has never been offered to WSUS, but only to Windows Update. This would indicate that it meant for unmanaged end-users and unmanaged small business users…

    This patch may be harmless, but why it was released and where it actually applies, it is still a mystery.

    It’s most likely associated with the 1809 rollout, although why it didn’t appear in early October when 1809 first raised its ugly head leaves me baffled.

  • Mystery patch KB 4023057 reappears — a “reliability improvement” to some 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709 and 1803 machines

    Posted on November 19th, 2018 at 11:58 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Here we go again.

    KB 4023057 has been updated, with a lengthy KB article and very little substance that I can discern.

    This update includes files and resources that address issues that affect the update processes in Windows 10 that may prevent important Windows updates from being installed. These improvements help make sure that updates are installed seamlessly on your device, and they help improve the reliability and security of devices that are running Windows 10.

    We saw it on Sept. 9 and earlier on January 8.

    @ch100 has offered the only explanation that makes sense to me:

    KB4023057 was and still is one of the most weird and unexplained updates in the recent times. This update has never been offered to WSUS, but only to Windows Update. This would indicate that it meant for unmanaged end-users and unmanaged small business users…

    This patch may be harmless, but why it was released and where it actually applies, it is still a mystery.

    It’s most likely associated with the 1809 rollout, although why it didn’t appear in early October when 1809 first raised its ugly head leaves me baffled. Anybody out there have a better intel?

  • Once again, KB 4023057 gets pushed out to all Win10 versions — and you don’t want it

    Posted on September 9th, 2018 at 09:32 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    I just switched off the metered connection on my production machine, and what to my wondering eyes should appear…

    KB 4023057 “Update to Windows 10, versions 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, and 1709 for update reliability” isn’t available in the Microsoft Update Catalog.  Per the KB article

    Only certain builds of Windows 10, versions 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, and 1709 require this update. Devices that are running those builds automatically get the update downloaded and installed through Windows Update.

    This update is also offered directly to Windows Update Client for some devices that have not installed the most recent updates. This update is not offered through the Microsoft Update Catalog.

    We’ve seen a patch with the same KB number numerous times in the history of Win10. @ch100 explained it thusly:

    KB4023057 was and still is one of the most weird and unexplained updates in the recent times. This update has never been offered to WSUS, but only to Windows Update. This would indicate that it meant for unmanaged end-users and unmanaged small business users…

    This patch may be harmless, but why it was released and where it actually applies, it is still a mystery.

    The KB article was updated on Sept 6.

    My recommendation: Fuhgeddaboutit. When you’re good and ready to upgrade to 1803 (or 1809, or — in my case — 1709), let Windows figure out what it needs to pull you into the borg.

    UPDATE: Günter Born has a detailed description.

  • The Big Bug rollup: Many problems, few solutions, with bugs in the July Patch Tuesday crop

    Posted on July 12th, 2018 at 07:46 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    I can’t believe how many bugs we’re seeing in this month’s patches.

    Oh. Wait a sec. Yeah, I can believe it.

    If you’re applying Windows/Office updates as soon as they come out, you clearly don’t understand the situation.

    Computerworld Woody on Windows.

  • Watch out: Win10 Update Facilitation as a Service and a new push for the Update Assistant

    Posted on June 18th, 2018 at 07:33 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Nag me all you want, Microsoft, but this is getting ridiculous. All I want is an “Off” button — until you figure out how to deliver reliable patches and upgrades.

    Computerworld Woody on Windows.

  • More Windows patches — and warnings about the Win10 1709 update KB 4089848

    Posted on March 23rd, 2018 at 08:24 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    In yet another out-of-out-of-band flurry, on Thursday Microsoft released new cumulative updates for all Win10 versions, a couple of Servicing Stack updates, two previews of Monthly rollups… and absolutely nothing that fixes the flaws in this month’s botched Win7 patch.

    And the Windows Update bypassing routine blamed for the forced push from Win10 1703 to 1709? It’s baaaaaaaaaack.

    Computerworld Woody on Windows.

    UPDATE: @PKCano found a patch for Win10 1709 that “This update makes improvements to ease the upgrade experience to Windows 10 Version 1709.”

    Go figger. KB 4094276. It’s listed on the KBNew page, but the link there (which was provided by Microsoft) doesn’t work.

  • Surprise! A new version of the Windows Update block-buster KB 4023057

    Posted on March 23rd, 2018 at 07:42 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    While scanning through the KBNew list, I bumped into an old f(r)iend, KB 4023057. Looks like it was re-issued on March 22 — along with about half a gazillion patches for Windows.

    KB 4023057, if you don’t recall, is the patch that’s credited with busting through sites that have Windows Update blocked. There’s a discussion here, with this description from abbodi86:

    it evolved from just fixing registry to restore tasks and fix drivers DB, and compatibilty for UAC management..

    the main purpose or function did not change: re-allow blocked or disabled WU

    Of course, Microsoft’s official description is the usual “Nothing to see here, folks” drivel:

    This update includes reliability improvements that affect the update service components in Windows 10 Versions 1507, 1511, 1607, and 1703.

    This update includes files and resources that address issues that affect the update processes in Windows 10. These improvements ensure that quality updates are installed seamlessly on your device and help to improve the reliability and security of devices running Windows 10.  When Windows update is available for your device, devices that do not have enough disk…

    Only certain builds of Windows 10 Versions 1507, 1511, 1607, and 1703 require this update. Devices that are running those builds will automatically get the update downloaded and installed through Windows Update.

    This update is also offered directly to Windows Update Client for some devices that have not installed the most recent updates. This update is not offered from the Microsoft Update Catalog.

    I just wish Microsoft could speak plainly. In this case, some Win10 users (not sure which ones) are getting a patch that (apparently?) breaks their wuauserv settings. I assume that its entire reason for existence is to push more people onto the next version of Win10.

    Does anybody out there have any better info?