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  • There’s a new KB 4023057 making the rounds

    Posted on May 17th, 2019 at 08:09 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Let’s see. It’s Friday. There must be a new version of KB 4023057, the “Update to Windows 10, versions 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709, and 1803 for update reliability reliability” patch.

    Reliably.

    Short version: We don’t really know what it does, except to blast away anything you or your machine has done to block upgrading to version 1903. Oddly, it still isn’t being released to Win10 1809.

    Günter Born has all the details. We’ve been covering it here forever.

  • Microsoft re-re-re…-releases KB 4023057, the “Update to Win10 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709, and 1803 for update reliability”

    Posted on April 6th, 2019 at 08:18 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    I last talked about it on Nov. 19:

    KB 4023057 has been updated, with a lengthy KB article and very little substance that I can discern.

    This update includes files and resources that address issues that affect the update processes in Windows 10 that may prevent important Windows updates from being installed. These improvements help make sure that updates are installed seamlessly on your device, and they help improve the reliability and security of devices that are running Windows 10.

    We saw it on Sept. 9 and earlier on January 8.

    @ch100 has offered the only explanation that makes sense to me:

    KB4023057 was and still is one of the most weird and unexplained updates in the recent times. This update has never been offered to WSUS, but only to Windows Update. This would indicate that it meant for unmanaged end-users and unmanaged small business users…

    This patch may be harmless, but why it was released and where it actually applies, it is still a mystery.

    The KB article has been updated with a release date of April 4. No doubt this version has more goodies to break the back of any system trying to avoid Win10 1903. Which is funny because 1803 and 1809 are supposed to grow native, built-in 1903 blocking features. More about that Monday morning in the AskWoody Plus Newsletter.

    If you want to well and truly hide it — which isn’t easy — follow @PKCano’s directions.

    Odd that MS hasn’t added Win1o 1809 to its list of affected versions.

  • Where we stand with the February patches

    Posted on March 1st, 2019 at 07:23 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    What an odd month.

    We got a ton of bugs introduced in the Patch Tuesday patches that were — mostly, but not completely — solved by patches later in the month. Microsoft’s still holding back on Win10 1809 patches, which is good news — but 1809 isn’t “ready for business.” And the mystery update bulldozer patch KB 4023057 has come out of the closet, into the Catalog.

    Details in Computerworld Woody on Windows.

    We’re still at MS-DEFCON 2. As far as I know, there are no major security problems solved by the February patches, so let’s give things a rest for now. Those of you using Win10 Pro or Enterprise, who follow my recommendations, have already installed updates, and everybody else should sit back and enjoy the weekend.

    UPDATE: And, of course, just minutes after the Computerworld article hit, Microsoft released KB 4482887 – the second February cumulative update for Win10 version 1809. Except they’re calling it the March 1 update. There’s an enormous list of 36 fixes. As usual for a second “optional non-security” cumulative update, you have to manually install it or click Check for updates.

  • MS-DEFCON 4: A perfect calm before the next patching storm

    Posted on December 7th, 2018 at 11:44 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Well, not literally perfect, but pretty close. Get your patches installed.

    There’s a new Flash update, KB 4471331, that you need (if it appears in your Windows Update list) and a new KB 4023057 that you don’t want.

    Last month’s tactic of setting Win10 Pro “quality update” (cumulative update) deferrals to 15 days seems to be working well. If you followed my advice last month, you already have your patches, and everything should be fine. You don’t need to lift a finger.

    Details in Computerworld. Woody on Windows

    We’re at MS-DEFCON 4: There are isolated problems with current patches, but they are well-known and documented here. Check this site to see if you’re affected and if things look OK, go ahead and patch.

  • Microsoft pushes yet another version of KB 4023057

    Posted on December 7th, 2018 at 10:42 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    In the perennial bad news department:

    Yesterday Microsoft released yet another version of KB 4023057, the Update to Windows 10, versions 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709, and 1803 for update reliability. This is the 20th or 30th version of the patch.

    As I said on Nov 19, the last time it was updated:

    @ch100 has offered the only explanation that makes sense to me:

    KB4023057 was and still is one of the most weird and unexplained updates in the recent times. This update has never been offered to WSUS, but only to Windows Update. This would indicate that it meant for unmanaged end-users and unmanaged small business users…

    This patch may be harmless, but why it was released and where it actually applies, it is still a mystery.

    It’s most likely associated with the 1809 rollout, although why it didn’t appear in early October when 1809 first raised its ugly head leaves me baffled.

  • Mystery patch KB 4023057 reappears — a “reliability improvement” to some 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, 1709 and 1803 machines

    Posted on November 19th, 2018 at 11:58 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Here we go again.

    KB 4023057 has been updated, with a lengthy KB article and very little substance that I can discern.

    This update includes files and resources that address issues that affect the update processes in Windows 10 that may prevent important Windows updates from being installed. These improvements help make sure that updates are installed seamlessly on your device, and they help improve the reliability and security of devices that are running Windows 10.

    We saw it on Sept. 9 and earlier on January 8.

    @ch100 has offered the only explanation that makes sense to me:

    KB4023057 was and still is one of the most weird and unexplained updates in the recent times. This update has never been offered to WSUS, but only to Windows Update. This would indicate that it meant for unmanaged end-users and unmanaged small business users…

    This patch may be harmless, but why it was released and where it actually applies, it is still a mystery.

    It’s most likely associated with the 1809 rollout, although why it didn’t appear in early October when 1809 first raised its ugly head leaves me baffled. Anybody out there have a better intel?

  • Once again, KB 4023057 gets pushed out to all Win10 versions — and you don’t want it

    Posted on September 9th, 2018 at 09:32 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    I just switched off the metered connection on my production machine, and what to my wondering eyes should appear…

    KB 4023057 “Update to Windows 10, versions 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, and 1709 for update reliability” isn’t available in the Microsoft Update Catalog.  Per the KB article

    Only certain builds of Windows 10, versions 1507, 1511, 1607, 1703, and 1709 require this update. Devices that are running those builds automatically get the update downloaded and installed through Windows Update.

    This update is also offered directly to Windows Update Client for some devices that have not installed the most recent updates. This update is not offered through the Microsoft Update Catalog.

    We’ve seen a patch with the same KB number numerous times in the history of Win10. @ch100 explained it thusly:

    KB4023057 was and still is one of the most weird and unexplained updates in the recent times. This update has never been offered to WSUS, but only to Windows Update. This would indicate that it meant for unmanaged end-users and unmanaged small business users…

    This patch may be harmless, but why it was released and where it actually applies, it is still a mystery.

    The KB article was updated on Sept 6.

    My recommendation: Fuhgeddaboutit. When you’re good and ready to upgrade to 1803 (or 1809, or — in my case — 1709), let Windows figure out what it needs to pull you into the borg.

    UPDATE: Günter Born has a detailed description.

  • The Big Bug rollup: Many problems, few solutions, with bugs in the July Patch Tuesday crop

    Posted on July 12th, 2018 at 07:46 woody Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    I can’t believe how many bugs we’re seeing in this month’s patches.

    Oh. Wait a sec. Yeah, I can believe it.

    If you’re applying Windows/Office updates as soon as they come out, you clearly don’t understand the situation.

    Computerworld Woody on Windows.