News, tips, advice, support for Windows, Office, PCs & more
Home icon Home icon Home icon Email icon RSS icon

We're community supported and proud of it!

Newsletter Archives

  • Click here to agree

    Posted on May 24th, 2021 at 01:04 Comment on the AskWoody Lounge
    AskWoody Plus Newsletter Logo
    ISSUE 18.19 • 2021-05-24

    LEGAL BRIEF

    Max Oppenheimer

    By Max Stul Oppenheimer, Esq.

    Any time you install new software or a new service, you are faced with a seemingly simple task: checking a box confirming that you agree to the company’s terms of service.

    If you’ve followed the associated link, chances are you’ve encountered 20 or 30 (or 40) pages of pseudo-English. Using the ubiquitous Microsoft Services Agreement as an example, here’s what you are typically agreeing to. For simplicity, we’ll stick with basic U.S. accounts. Most specific products and some special types of account (for example, accounts for minors, education accounts, and organizational accounts) have additional rules. Other rules apply in other countries. Your mileage may vary.

    Read the full story in the AskWoody Plus Newsletter 18.19.0 (2021-05-24).
    This story also appears in the AskWoody Free Newsletter 18.19.F (2021-05-24).

  • Adobe license revoked … Hello, Updated Terms

    Posted on May 8th, 2020 at 15:21 Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    Yesterday, while busy working in Adobe Acrobat Pro (as part of Creative Suite 6), I had an unwelcome pop-up appear while I was in a hurry, telling me that my license had been revoked, and that to continue working on the document that my client was waiting for, I had to re-enter the software’s license number.

    This isn’t a cloud product with a dreaded monthly fee, but one of those where I paid a pretty penny for the software in advance, and don’t owe the company to be able to use it after that purchase.

    Finding the license number slowed me down a little. Then when I entered it, I was advised that a log-in was required or I would be in demo mode for up to 7 days, when it would again fail. I had to waste more time searching out the log in details, and in that log-in process, I received a screen headed Updated Terms – accept or else. I was rushing, and flustered. You can imagine how much time I had to read screeds of legalese.

    Now, this isn’t the first time I’ve had an issue with Adobe needing to have the license number reinstalled to take me out of demo mode for a paid suite, usually at an equally inconvenient moment. But I did wonder if I was the only one getting a license revoked pop up now.

    A little searching led me to find:

    Adobe General Terms of Use

    Published March 16, 2020. Effective as of April 16, 2020. These Terms replace and supersede all prior versions.

    THE MANDATORY ARBITRATION PROVISION AND CLASS ACTION WAIVER IN SECTION 14 (DISPUTE RESOLUTION) BELOW GOVERN THE RESOLUTION OF DISPUTES. PLEASE READ THEM CAREFULLY. IF YOU DO NOT AGREE WITH THE MANDATORY ARBITRATION PROVISION AND CLASS ACTION WAIVER IN THE TERMS, PLEASE DO NOT USE THE SERVICES OR SOFTWARE.

    Yes, I have been using the product since April 16th. So why now?! Have you seen this?

    If you’d like to read the new terms, you can find them here

  • Microsoft’s new Terms of Service take shots at Google but leave loopholes

    Posted on June 13th, 2014 at 14:00 Comment on the AskWoody Lounge

    It’s not nearly as simple as you might think.

    InfoWorld Tech Watch.